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Why had Internatioanl Peace Collapsed by 1939?

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Introduction

´╗┐Why Had International Peace Collapsed by 1939? When Hitler took power in Germany in 1933 he was pledged to reverse the Treaty of Versailles and to increase German territory, which he had already laid out in his book, Mein Kampf in 1924. Hitler was pledged to reverse the Treaty of Versailles because he had promised to do so if he became leader of Germany, as to him and to all Germans, it was a constant reminder of their defeat in World War One and of their humiliation by the Allies[1]. By the time Hitler came to power, some terms had already been changed; Germany had stopped paying reparations, as an example. The Treaty of Versailles had also taken territory from Germany, that Hitler now wanted back. Mostly, he said that he wanted Self-determination, allowing German ?minorities?, such as in the Sudetenland, in Czechoslovakia, to join Germany.[2] Self-determination had been one of Woodrow Wilsons 14 point included in the Treaty of Versailles, which had been denied to Germany. Hitler also wanted to unite with Austria, known as the Anschluss, which was also forbidden by the Treaty of Versailles and he wanted to carve out Lebensraum or ?living space? in the east of Europe[3]. These aims would eventually lead to another war. ...read more.

Middle

His argument was that the Czech government was mistreating Germans in the Sudetenland, and that they had to be rescued. He also said that it was his last ?territorial demand?. Chamberlin said that the demand was unreasonable and war seemed near, however in a final meeting in Munich, on September 29th 1938, Britain, France and Italy decided that the Sudetenland should be given to Germany[10]. Neither the Czechs not the Soviet Union were consulted[11]. Britain and France followed the policy of Appeasement for a couple of reasons. They were not yet ready to fight, Brits and French did not want to fight another war after roughly twenty years of peace, as Stalin was their main worry and they saw Hitler as the buffer to the threat of communism, also may thought that the Treaty of Versailles had been unfair and that once these wrong were put right, Germany would become peaceful and both Britain and France were still suffering from the Great Depression, they had no money, large debs and high unemployment[12]. On August 23rd, 1939 the Nazis and the Soviets signed the Nazi-Soviet Non Aggression Pact. This didn?t mean that they were allies who would fight together, instead it meant that they were on friendly bases with each other; however, they did not really trust each other. ...read more.

Conclusion

this allowed Hitler to take Austria and Sudetenland ?legally? with the excuse of self-determination and with the argument that the league of nations hardly did anything against Japan and Italy. All of the above points, and of course more, led to the collapse of peace in 1939, and to the begin of World War Two. ________________ [1] Walsh, Ben. Modern World History. London: Hodder Murray, 1996. Print. (page 256) [2] Walsh, Ben. Modern World History. London: Hodder Murray, 1996. Print. (page 89) [3] Sieder, Reinhard. Globalgeschichte. Wien: Ernst Langthaler, 2010. Print. [4] http://ww2db.com/battle_spec.php?battle_id=82 [5] http://www.sudeten.de/cms/?Historie:1919_-_1945 [6] Walsh, Ben. Modern World History. London: Hodder Murray, 1996. Print. (page 263) [7] http://ariald.wordpress.com/2010/04/20/deutschland-und-osterreich-wiedervereinigung-im-jahre-2040/ [8] Walsh, Ben. Modern World History. London: Hodder Murray, 1996. Print. (page 263) [9] Walsh, Ben. Modern World History. London: Hodder Murray, 1996. Print. (page 266) [10] http://www.johndclare.net/EII3.htm [11] Walsh, Ben. Modern World History. London: Hodder Murray, 1996. Print. (page 267) [12] Walsh, Ben. Modern World History. London: Hodder Murray, 1996. Print. (page 264) [13] Walsh, Ben. Modern World History. London: Hodder Murray, 1996. Print. (page 272) [14] Walsh, Ben. Modern World History. London: Hodder Murray, 1996. Print. (page 272) [15] Walsh, Ben. Modern World History. London: Hodder Murray, 1996. Print. (page 272) [16] Sieder, Reinhard. Globalgeschichte. Wien: Ernst Langthaler, 2010. Print. [17] Walsh, Ben. Modern World History. London: Hodder Murray, 1996. Print. (page 89) ...read more.

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