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Organizational Behaviour

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Introduction

Organizational Behaviour --Ideas and Concepts as the Writer Understands As we all know and have all experienced, organizational behaviour is the knowledge concerned with the structure, functioning, performance of an organization, and the behaviour of groups and individuals within it. Organizational behaviour is a wide-spread notion and closely related to organization chart, organization culture, organization development, organization dilemma, and organizational socialization, etc. Though it's an intangible theory of multifacets, organizational behaviour does play an immeasurable role geared to our needs in many fields. However, how does the writer understand organizational behaviour? Behind this question lies sorts of sophisticated tracking-down of this fascinating miracle of organizational behaviour. Organizational bahaviour is extremely important to our life and work. It has a great influence on them, but it is very hard to understand as well. The writer here wants to develop five points as he has understood. They are group or team roles and leadership, social responsibility, motivation, personality within the organizational behaviour territory. Team Roles and Leadership Team roles and leadership are related to each other and linked by collective goals. What do these concepts mean? Let's go to Huczynski and Buchanan(2001:890, 882) ...read more.

Middle

2) whether or not you want to accept other ideas? 3) whether or not people are happy in doing their work and productivity is high? and 4) whether or not people enjoy their work and are productive because of positive reinforcement? Leadership is related to how you think you would like to behave before and with your employees and to how you work out optimized projects for your firms. Social Responsibility Social responsibility is an obligation loaded on a person in a social context who, when in charge of a task, function or assignment, takes a certain position in an organization structure. Take a glance at this definition and we will have an explicit understanding of the concept of social responsibility. First, this obligation is social, i.e., it involves the society, an organization or a social group; secondly, the person, when in charge of a certain task, function or assignment, must fulfill (a) certain obligation(s) which is/are loaded on him/her by the society, an organization or social group; thirdly, the person takes a certain position in the organization structure. The fundamental responsibility of managers, for example, is to develop appropriate behaviour strategies to manage themselves and affect others both below and above. ...read more.

Conclusion

Generally, Type A are aggressive, impatient, extremely alert; in contrast, Type B are easy-going, seldom impatient, and relaxed. Their personality determines their mental, and to a certain extent, their physical situation. Therefore personality influences both our mental and physical behaviour and development. From what we have discussed above, we can see that organizational behaviour does not only involve organizations or social groups but also individuals in a society. It lies in almost every facet of human activities, in which there exist fascinating laws that govern human beings' social behaviour, because human beings are first and foremost social beings. In a broad or macro sense, by taking advantage of a knowledge and a conscious application of the laws of organizational behaviour, people in this world could be more harmonious; without wars or terrorism, people could build up a more beautiful and more prosperous world. In a practical or micro sense, again with a knowledge and a conscious application of the laws of organizational behaviour, a firm may operate better and gain more profits. In a word, with an understanding of this fascinating miracle of organizational behaviour, the human being could, by following its laws, build a better life, of which every one of us is a part. ...read more.

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