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Beetroot Experiment.

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Introduction

Beetroot Experiment. Introduction: After completing the experiment I will now proceed to draw my results, discussion and evaluation to determine what exactly happened. Table of Results: Temperature ( C) Absorbance (%) fridge 0.26 30 0.08 35 0.15 40 0.14 45 0.18 50 0.21 55 0.23 60 0.25 65 0.38 70 0.41 75 0.46 Discussion: Through observations from the line graph that I have constructed, it is quite certain that there is a general pattern. There is a general steady increase represented by a positive correlation. It shows that as the temperature increases the percentage of absorbance also increases, meaning that more pigment diffuses through the beetroot's cell membrane at higher temperatures. There is one exception, which is the subject that was situated within the fridge as this is clearly an anomaly. The solution that was placed in the fridge does not conform to the general increase, therefore owing to the fact that it is an anomaly. The reason that this is an anomaly is subsequently due to the fact that the beetroot cells were not allowed to work to their optimum, and as the temperature is so cold compared to the other samples, the permeability of the cell membrane was quite high. ...read more.

Middle

This means that as the water flows into the beetroot cells, they become turgid, then as excess water flows into the cells, the cell bursts releasing the pigment into the water. The higher the temperature the faster the water molecules move because they have more kinetic energy thus the process occurs faster and effects more cells. It is worth mentioning that as the temperature increases by every 5 degrees, denaturisation is having more of an impact, as the percentage of absorption in the colorimeter increases. It was important to have washed the beetroot before carrying out the experiment, in order to wash out pigment from the cells that were damaged when using the cork borer and knife. For this experiment to have been more successful then the variables would need to be kept more constant, although this is incredibly difficult to master, so it is not really an option when trying to improve upon the investigation. A good way to help make the experiment more worthwhile is to attempt each temperature several more times to ensure that you get a more reliable result, which you can also work out an average figure. The anomaly was the sample placed in the fridge, which seemed to give a rather large percentage of beetroot pigment concentration, due to the fact that the cell membrane could not work at such a cold temperature, and therefore the pigment was easily diffused. ...read more.

Conclusion

Difference in absorbance (%) fridge 0 30 -0.18 35 0.07 40 -0.1 45 0.04 50 0.03 55 0.02 60 0.02 65 0.13 70 0.03 75 0.05 As you can see there are some distinct similarities betwixt these figures, but also some differences. Excluding the fridge sample and the small error between 35 and 40, you can see that an increase of about 0.02% - 0.03% is common across the board, but there with one exception, and that is the difference between 60 C and 65 C. The difference here is much larger, a clear source of error, but to be quite certain of this, I would have to carry out another test. This concept of error is quite interesting and would be worth having a closer look at. Another matter to take into account is the water baths themselves, the temperature although being measured by a thermometer and a digital reading, it could be for example at a temperature of 35.4 C, but be rounded off to 35 C. This minor judgement will probably have little effect upon the overall result. One of the main sources of error is mostly due to the beetroot itself, they are all cut into relatively the same dimensions, but this could have an effect, due to the idea that if the beetroot is bigger then it has more surface area and will hence release a greater amount of beetroot pigment. DUNCAN BEARD ...read more.

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