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Finding the Concentration of Limewater in a Titration Using Hydrochloric Acid as a reagent

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Introduction

Finding the Concentration of Limewater in a Titration Using Hydrochloric Acid as a reagent Aim: The aim of this experiment is it to find the concentration of Limewater (g dm-3) in a titration experiment using hydrochloric acid of concentration exactly 2.00 mol dm-3 as a reagent. Equipment: I will need a burette, 25ml pipette, pipette filler, white tile, teat pipette, clamp stand, boss head, clamp, limewater, phenolphthalein indicator, hydrochloric acid, volumetric flask, funnel, distilled water, conical flasks, safety gear and a calculator. Equation: 2HCl (aq) + Ca(OH)2 (aq) --> 2H20(l) + CaCl2(aq) Quantity and concentration of reagent used: 100ml & 2.00 mol dm-3 HCL Method: First things first, Lab coats and Goggles must be worn at all times. This safety rule should not be disobeyed due to fact we are using hazardous chemicals their hazards must be taken into account. The chemicals that we will use are limewater, hydrochloric acid and Phenolphthalein indicator. The hazards are as follows: Hydrochloric acid - Very corrosive, irritant. ...read more.

Middle

(The need for the phenolphthalein indicator is to show the user when a neutralization reaction has occurred as that is the moment when the solution is no longer alkaline and it below PH 8.4) Next, set up the washed & clean burette on the clamp stand and add the dilute HCL into the top of the burette with a funnel, making sure the tap is closed. Fill up to the 0.00ml mark (making sure that the level of the 0.00ml line is at the bottom of the meniscus). Then place the conical flask of calcium hydroxide under the burette and the white tile under the flask. Begin to let the acid pour slowly into the calcium hydroxide and stir the conical flask slowly. When the solution starts to loose its colour slow the rate of the acid more and the moment the solution looses all colour stop, this is the end point. The solution should turn from pink to colourless. ...read more.

Conclusion

= Numb of Mol (N) Volume (V) N = C x V N = 0.20 mol dm-3 x 3.60 cm3 N = 0.20 mol dm-3 x 3.6x10-3 N = 7.20 x 10 - 4 moles Equation: 2HCl (aq) + Ca(OH)2 (aq) --> 2H20(l) + CaCl2(aq) The number of mol. of Ca(OH)2: HCL : Ca(OH)2 2 : 1 7.2 x 10 - 4 moles : 3.60 x 10 - 4 moles Concentration of the limewater in mol dm-3: Concentration (C) = Numb of Mol (N) Volume (V) N = 3.60 x 10 - 4 moles V = 25 cm3 = 0.025 dm-3 C = 3.60 x 10 - 4 moles 0.025 dm-3 C = 0.0144 mol dm-3 = 0.01 mol dm-3 Average: Average = 3.70 cm3 + 3.50 cm3 + 3.60 cm3 3 Average = 3.60 cm3 Concentration of the limewater in g dm-3: To calculate the concentration of the limewater in g dm-3 we multiply the concentration of the limewater in mol dm-3 by the relative molecular mass of limewater. C = 0.0144 mol dm-3 x 74.1 = 1.06704 g dm-3 = 1.07 g dm-3 Rohan Malhotra Chemistry-Titration Mrs Newnham ...read more.

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