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Meat microbiology for quality control program in processing plant.

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Introduction

Chyr Lou C.Y. 1986. Meat Microbiology. APO Training Course on Quality Control for Processed Foods B. controlling Quality of Raw Materials from the Production Point. 5. Microbiogy in Quality of Raw Materials.P.5~14 Meat microbiology for quality control program in processing plant�C05� Chyr Lou Chu-Ying Ph.D, Dept. of Animal Husbandry, National Taiwan Univ. Introduction The original goal of meat processing was to produce a product that would keep for long periods of time without spoilage. Since the most rapid and most frequent type of meat spoilage is due to microbial growth, microbial inhibition has always been the first concern for people involved with handling systems. Meat is an excellent growth media for microorganisms and spoilage will take place very rapidly if some precautions are not taken. Even with the best of care, however, microbial growth is only slowed; it is virtually never completely stopped. Muscle, in the live animal, is essentially sterile, and so all microbial contamination that occurs must come in the slaughter and handling processes (cutting, grinding, mixing,etc.) that are used. Sources of contamination are extensive with some of the more common ones being human (hands, etc,), air, equipment, other ingredients (spices ans other) and carcass surfaces such as viscera. Concerns for microbiological quality of meat goes beyond simple spoilage,however. A more serious concern is for growth of pathogenic (disease causing) organisms that might be unknowingly consumed. ...read more.

Middle

m. For confirm test that inoculating into fermentation tubes of LSTB (incubating at 35?) and EC (incubating at 45.5?) for 1-2 days. Gas production from LSTB tubes and EC tubes i ndicates the presence of coliform and E. coli, respectively. A Coagulase-Positive Staphylococci-Staphylococcus aureus Staphylococci are widely distributed in man's environment and occur in varying numbers in air, dust, water, milk, feces, staphylococcal infections. When animals are beaten, mistreated, or injured, such mishandling often results in the production of deep-seated abscesses containing viable staphylococci as well as other organisms. The single most important source of S. aureus in foods is man. Man is an major host for this species, most often carrying the organisms on his hands, arms and other skin areas, nasal passages, throat and hair. S. aureus, in addition to producing enterotoxin when it grows in food, is associated with a variety of pyemic infections in man ranging from localized pus-containing lesions such as infected cuts, abrasions, pimples and carbuncles to those that are more generalized and systemic. It is for this reason that employees must wear gloveswhen handling processed meats and that individuals with infected scratches or wounds, boils, or respiratory infections should not be allowed to have direct contact with meat products. The cause of the food poisoning by S. aureus is due to a specific protein formed during the growth of the organism in certain kinds of foods such as barbequed, cooked or roast beef, pork, chicken and turkey, hams meat mixtures, milk products, egg products, salads, and cream-filled products. ...read more.

Conclusion

S. A. Ohio Steaks Roast Ground beef Ground veal Ground lamb Pork sausage Beef sausage Bologna Frankfurters Braunschweiger Smoked sausage Cold cuts 5�106 5�106 1.5�107 1.5�107 1.5�107 1.5�107 1.5�107 1�106 1�106 1�106 1�106 1�106 1.5�103 1.5�103 1�104 1�104 1�104 1�104 1�104 5�103 5�103 5�103 5�103 5�103 Guideline Guideline Guideline Guideline Guideline Guideline Guideline Guideline Guideline Guideline Guideline Guideline U. S. A. Tennessee Fresh red meats 5�106 1�103 50 1�103 Negative Fecal Strep. 1�103 Guideline Processed meats 1�106 1�102 10 1�103 Negative Fecal Strep. 1�103 Guideline Table 2 Microorganisms associated with spoilage of various meat products Product Microorganism Type of spoilage produced Fresh meat Pseudomonas Achromobacter Flavobacterium Production of slime, greenish discolorations, fluorescent pigments, white to colored spots.(bacterial colonies). Lactobacillus Microbacterium Micrococcus Sliminess or stickiness, souring or putrefaction. Processed meats Ham, cured Achromobacter Pseudomonas Bacillus Lactobacillus Various bone and meat "sours". Streptococcus Clostridia Gas pockets in muscle, "gassy or puffers," greenish discoloration. Micrococcus Microbacterium Yeasts Surface slime. Bacon Streptococcus Mold Slime formation, white to colored spots or discoloration. Lactobacillus Micrococcus Streptococcus Slight souring in vaccum-packaged bacon. "Cured" sausages Micrococcus Yeasts Surface slime. Lactobacillus Gas production in vaccum-packaged frankfurters. Leuconostoc Micrococcus Chill rings(fading of cured color at outer surfaces) Lactobacillus Greenish discolorations. Fermented sausages Yeasts and molds Slime and discolorations. Vinegar-pickled meats Lactobacillus (acid-tolerant) Cloudy or ropy brine. Canned meats, commercially sterile Bacillus spores Clostridia spores Thermophilic growth due to inadequate cooling; survival and growth due to excessive initial numbers. Canned meats, semipreserved Streptococcus souring and discolorations. Bacillus Clostridium Liquefaction of gelatin and proteolysis at greater than 10?. ...read more.

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