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Recycling- The Effects

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Introduction

GCSE Additional Science (2103) Unit B2 (5021) Topic 4 - Interdependence Assessment Brief: Recycling. On average UK households produce 30.5 million tonnes of waste every year, of which only 17% is collected for recycling. Compared to our neighbouring EU (European Union) countries, which recycle over 50% of their waste, this figure is pretty low. Up to 60% of rubbish that resides in UK dustbins could be recycled, and if all cans in the UK were recycled, we would not need 14 million dustbins. These figures alone explain why the act of recycling our waste in the UK is increasing each year. I have decided to research into the topic of recycling and the reasons why people in the North West choose whether to or not to recycle. I have created a questionnaire (enclosed) related to recycling and distributed copies to 50 different people in the North West of England. I have analysed and displayed the results below in graph and table formats showing the amount of people that opted for each answer. Do you recycle? Yes 42 No 8 ______________________________________________________________ If you do not recycle, why? ...read more.

Middle

As these are all fairly common household items, it is hardly surprising that these are recycled most. Graph 5 and 6: Over half of those surveyed said that they found recycling easy and those who said they didn't find the process easy told us why. These reasons averaged out with little difference in popularity between them. Graph 7: The results showed that most people have been recycling between 0 and 2 years. This is fairly accurate as around 2 years ago, environmental issues such as climate change were publicised more within the media, therefore increasing awareness and promoting recycling. Graph 8: The main reasons people chose for why they started to recycle in the first place were both to do with the environment; again this shows that awareness of such issue has risen therefore increasing action taken against such matters. Graph 9: The majority of people told us that they feel there is more than enough information available to those who seek it about recycling. Conclusions From my data, I have come to the conclusion that the majority of the population of the North West are genuinely concerned about their environment and the growing issue of climate change. ...read more.

Conclusion

They believe that global warming will then result in an ice age that will then lead to another normal state, just like it is now. In my global warming is an important issue and should not be ignored. Recycling is a good method to help combat the oncoming problem however it cannot compete with global warming alone. Other methods have to be considered if we are to prevent climate change and they must be put into action soon. Glossary Recycling - The process by which resources are used again. Carbon footprint - The amount of fossil fuels you use in your every day life that contribute towards global warming. Carbon neutral - Where no carbon footprint is left by replanting trees or any other method. Biodiversity - the variety of different types of organisms in a habitat or ecosystem. Conservation - the process by which ecosystems are kept stable as environmental issues change; these conditions include both biotic (living things) and abiotic (temperature, light etc.) factors. Environment - The surroundings in which an organism lives. Pollution - the contamination of an environment by chemicals, waste or heat that threatens existing habitats and/or endangers organisms. Resource - A raw material that is used by an organism. ?? ?? ?? ?? Susy Lumsden 11F1 Biology. ...read more.

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