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Modern Britain is now a secular society. To what extent do sociological arguments and evidence agree with this view?

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Introduction

?Modern Britain is now a secular society.? To what extent do sociological arguments and evidence agree with this view? A hot sociological debate is that Britain today is becoming more secular. One explanation for this is that we now have a more technological view, meaning we are looking for more scientific and technological reasons for why thing happen rather than religious or supernatural reasons. This idea is supported by Heelas and Woodhead who found a large percentage of people who attend churches and chapels were there to engage in spiritual activities rather than religious ones. ...read more.

Middle

Sociologist Leger put secularisation today down to spiritual shopping. Leger suggests that because children are no longer influenced by their parents and told what to believe they instead ?pic n mix? religion ? choosing bits which reflect their needs and aspirations. In addition Stark and Bainbridge argue that religion isn?t declining and will never end. Stark and Bainbridge believe there is a cycle when institutions begin to decline it makes space for new religious movements which revise and renew people?s beliefs. Thus meaning people remain religious they just choose more up to date religions. ...read more.

Conclusion

Meaning that religion is no longer a social institution but a cultural resource that we can draw upon if we wish too. In conclusion there are many arguments against the fact that Britain is becoming more secular ? instead the possible reasons for thinking so is that we believe without belonging and search for more scientific and technological explanations for things. However Stark and Bainbridge argue we will never become secular instead what we believe will change in order to revise and renew peoples beliefs. There are sufficient arguments for both Britain becoming secular and Britain remaining religious. ...read more.

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