• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

"Women were second-class citizens in the year 1900". How far is this a true assessment of women at the beginning of the Twentieth century?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"Women were second-class citizens in the year 1900". How far is this a true assessment of women at the beginning of the Twentieth century? This is difficult to answer as it is hard to determine whether all women had the same problem or whether some were better treated than others. There are many views as to whether women were second-class citizens and it is a widely speculated point as many different people have many different answers. There is much evidence that women were second-class citizens in the year 1900, but there is also evidence that they were not treated too badly and some even liked the way things were. In spite of this, some campaigned for more equality in many areas such as political rights and marriage. This is shown in many ways. There were limited job opportunities and women were only allowed to do domestic service, nursing, teaching, factory work, shop work or living at home and working there. ...read more.

Middle

There was a Custody of Infants Act passed which meant that women who were divorced were able to keep their children. The Married Women's Property Acts in 1870 and 1882 meant that they were able to keep any land they owned before they got married as their own and not their husband's. The Guardianship of Infants Act and Married Women's Act in 1886 allowed women even more freedom when it came to marriage and divorce. This shows that in 1900 women were not too badly treated when it came to marriage. Working-class and Middle-class women had life very differently. Working-class women generally worked all day and came home to housework, cooking, cleaning etc. In contrast to this, most middle-class women did not have to work as their husband supported the family. Despite this it meant that the middle-class women had very little freedom and although they were not tied down to working life it gave them very little to do and therefore they were probably treated more like second-class citizens than the working-class because of their limited opportunities. ...read more.

Conclusion

This meant that, although in some areas such as the vote, political rights and many job respects they were treated as less than the men, they were not completely treated as second-class citizens. The fact that they were viewed as second-class citizens in some respects shows, in my opinion, nothing but human nature as every being looks down on something, in this case, the men looked down on the women and the women looked down on the children who had even less rights than they. This is still true nowadays as humans, even though we are now largely equal, look down on people of different nationalities, race, religion, colour etc and also humans look down on animals which in turn look down on each other for example; the lion is the "king of the jungle" so it probably looks down on the tigers etc. This is just the nature of living creatures so in my opinion, women were not treated too badly in 1900 and have come a long way since then. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Work & Leisure section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Work & Leisure essays

  1. SOCIAL CLASS DIVISION

    In other words, working-class underachievement is taken-for-granted but it is shaped in such an ideological way that the education system and the capitalist system are rarely blamed by the working-class for their failure. The Marxist, Pierre Bourdieu (1974) has developed the 'cultural capital' theory of achievement and underachievement in order to explain some of these processes.

  2. Explain the emergence of compulsory mass education in England during the second half ...

    The Royal Commissions between 1850 and 1870 including the Newcastle act illuminated that out of 2.5 million children there was 1.5 million occasionally attending schools. Other inquiries such as the Tourton Report examining the middling sorts education and the Clarendon Report looking at public schooling, took place in the 1860's.

  1. Find out what subjects girls study more in higher education as well as for ...

    Pupils in Year S4 in Scotland. See Appendix, Part 3: Qualifications. 2 Data are for England and Wales only. Source: Department for Education and Skills; National Assembly for Wales; Scottish Executive; Northern Ireland Department of Education There is a wide variety of subjects available, and there are differences in subject choice between males and females.

  2. In the 15th Century the idea of 'schooling' began, the church ran the schools

    It is used during the process of 'streaming' within school subjects. For example pupils who the teacher feels is good or poor at a certain subject, will be taught in a high or low ability group, this has criticisms at it encourages pupils to think of themselves as having fixed educational ability.

  1. To what extent had the role and status of women in society improve by ...

    Working women had no choice whether they could work or not as it was necessary for them and there families to survive. Many worked in unskilled jobs such as Domestic service, "sweated trades" or in the textile industry. However despite nearly 32% of the British working force were female, work

  2. To what extent did women become more emancipated in the period 1800-1914? In 1800 ...

    The focus at this time was on universal education of all, but this education was gender specific, as the academic education of boys seemed to take priority. This does not mean to say that this did not aid women's emancipation, as the skills acquired would be very useful in the suffragette years to come.

  1. 1) Describe the employment opportunities of women in Britain in 1914?

    Woman could supervise sinning and weaving machines, and more or less nine hundred thousand women worked in the textile Industry. The Sweated trade also engaged large numbers of women, the figure almost climbing to a million. The working fields of the Sweated trades were the clothing and the dressmaking industries.

  2. 20th Century Drama

    Though now treaties and agreements and organisations have been devised to prevent war. A modern audience might not fully understand or sympathise with the characters of Pygmalion because the issues George Bernard Shaw was trying to illustrate are not relevant in today's society.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work