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Management of Employment Relations.

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Introduction

Management of Employment Relations 200151 Essay Karina Montoya SN 13097631 Tutorial: Thursday 12-1 There is evidence suggesting that, "Despite attempts to modernise the National Training Regime by aligning it with the needs of industry and making it more flexible and portable, there are doubts about the ability of the regime to meet the skill requirements necessary to sustain a competitive and modern economy". The National Training Regime is a regime that has been created to put all qualifications into a framework and make people's qualifications portable. The National Training Regime/Strategy states the vision anf five objectives for the National VET ( Vocational Education and Training) system, as agreed by all Commonwealth, State and Territory governments, and strategies to achieve the objectives. These objectives are toequip Australians for the world of work; enhance mobility in the labour market; achieve equitable outcomes in vocational education and training; increase investment in training; and maximise the value of public education and training expenditure. The National Training Regime is managed by ANTA (The Australian National Training Authority). A Commonwealth statutory authority providing a national focus for vocational education and training. ANTA's mission as stated in ANTA (1998), Bridge to the Future: The National Strategy for Vocational Education and Training 1998-2004. ...read more.

Middle

A majority of the workforce is employed as full-time permanent employees, but it is clear that casual employment is the dominant form in Australia of what can be called 'non-standard' employment. According to Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) figures, almost 2 million employees were classified as 'casual' employees in their main job in August 1999. ( Campbell, 2001, p.62) The age groups with the highest proportions of employees employed as casuals in August 1998 are the 15 to 24 age group (45 per cent) and the 55 and over age group (28 per cent). (ABS,1999b). (Curtain, 2001, p. 108). Studies also show that casual workers tend to work in lower skilled occupations. Generally, the proportion of casual decreased as the skill level of the occupation group increased. The other aspect of the change in the nature of employment is the increase in part-time work, particularly for men. In the last 10 years, the growth in the number of men working part-time has outstripped the growth in the number of women working part-time. Casual employees in Australia enjoy remarkably few rights, benefits and forms of protection. Casual employees suffer significant disadvantages in comparison with permanent employees. Starting with a lack of entitlement to paid holiday leave and paid sick leave, casual employment is characterised by a general shortfall in protection.Campbell said, " It is certainly true that casual employment appears as a highly 'flexible' form of employment . ...read more.

Conclusion

It is evident that there is indeed a training deficit, and it is arguable that the existing stock of skills is not being adequately replaced while new areas of need are underdeveloped. It is clear that despite attempts to modernise the National Training Regime by aligning it with the needs of industry and making it more flexible and portable, there are doubts about the ability of the regime to meet the skill requirements necessary to sustain a competitive and modern economy. Reference List ANTA (1998), Bridge to the Future: The National Strategy for Vocational Education and Training 1998-2004. Available: http:anta.gov.au/dapstrategy.asp. Pickersgill, R., (2001) Skill Formation in Australia Beyond 2000, 121-139, International Journal of Employment Studies, Vol. 9, No.1, April 2001 Connell, J., & Burgess, J., (2001) Skill, Training and Workforce Restructuring in Australia, p.1-24, International Journal of Employment Studies, Vol. 9, No.1, April 2001. Curtain, R., (2001) Flexible Workers and Access to Training, p. 103-120, International Journal of Employment Studies, Vol. 9, No.1, April 2001. Campbell, I., (2001), Casual Employees and the Training Deficit: Exploring Employer Contributions and Choices, p. 61-102, International Journal of Employment Studies, Vol. 9, No.1, April 2001 Lewer, J., & Gallimore, P., (2001) Are Outsourcing and Skill Formation Mutually exclusive?, p. 141-162, International Journal of Employment Studies, Vol. 9, No.1, April 2001. ...read more.

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