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The natural resource base of a country is fundamental to any explanation of its level of national economic development critically examine this statement.

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Introduction

Essay 1 Kathryn Murray Geography Level 1 0500060 'The natural resource base of a country is fundamental to any explanation of its level of national economic development' critically examine this statement. In this essay I aim to show the true importance of natural resource to the economic growth of a country. I will be discussing Japans and Canada's economic situation as well as comparing it to Saudi Arabia in relation to the availability of natural resources. Indicators such as GNP per capita, Literacy rates, and the countries exports and imports will be studied to help suggest if a natural resource base is fundamental to national economic development of a county. Natural resources are a vital part in the development of the Worlds economy. There is lack of theory in terms of generalising about the relationship between resources and development. Japan is a good example. As explained Japan is a very rich economic country. Manufacturing is its strength but it has few natural resources. The countries successful economy is based on the export of high quality consumer goods developed with the latest technologies for example Toyota, Sony, Fujifilm and Panasonic are famous across the globe. One common pattern is for Japanese companies to import raw materials and then process them to make finished products, which are sold domestically or exported. ...read more.

Middle

Japan is a prime example of that a natural resource base is not fundamental to a country's development. It's the ability to use and convert these natural resources for example iron ore into steal. 8'Blessed with natural resources'. From another perspective, the theory of development says that natural resource base is positive in the terms of the benefits for a country. For example Canada has a rich natural resource base. It's an extremely affluent, high tech industrial society with high standards of living. When looking at indicators Canada can be seen as a well developed country. GNP per capita is at an impressive $31,500. This ranks above Japan. The literacy rate for the population is 98%. 9 It has been said that the country's high income and high standard of living is that its export of natural resource financed the growth and diversification of its national economy in a very beneficial way (Sheppard & Barnes). Iron ore, nickel, and zinc, copper, gold, lead, molybdenum, potash, diamonds, silver, fish, timber, wildlife, coal, petroleum, natural gas and hydropower are the main resources. These natural resources along with skilled labour and capital help to secure solid economical prospects. However Canada does not just export these primary resources, it uses them to produce manufactured goods such as; motor vehicles and parts, industrial machinery, aircraft, telecommunications equipment, chemicals and fertilizers along with its natural resources such as timber.10Canada has a large amount of exports $315.6 billion. ...read more.

Conclusion

A Companion to Economic Geography, Blackwell publishers. 2 Central Intelligence Agency (2005). The World Fact Book. Japan Economy overview. http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/ja.html, last modified 1st November 2005. Accessed 24.11.05 3 US Department of State http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/4142.htm , last modified August 2005, accessed 1/09/05 4 Ackerman, E (1953) Japans Natural Resources and Their Relation To Japans Economic Future. 5 Central Intelligence Agency. The World Fact Book (2005). Japan Economy overview. http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/ja.html, last modified 1st November 2005. Accessed 24.11.05 6 Central Intelligence Agency. The World Fact Book (2005). Japan Economy overview. http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/ja.html, last modified 1st November 2005. Accessed 24.11.05 7 Central Intelligence Agency. The World Fact Book (2005). Japan Economy overview. http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/ja.html, last modified 1st November 2005. Accessed 24.11.05 8 Sheppard, E and Barnes, T (2003) A Companion to Economic Geography, Blackwell publishers. Page 234 9 Sheppard, E and Barnes, T (2003) A Companion to Economic Geography, Blackwell publishers. Page 235 10 The World Fact Book (2005). Japan Economy overview. http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/ja.html, last modified 1st November 2005. Accessed 24.11.05 11 The World Fact Book (2005). Canada Economy overview. http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/ja.html, last modified 1st November 2005. Accessed 24.11.05 12 Sheppard, E and Barnes, T (2003) A Companion to Economic Geography, Blackwell publishers. Page 235 13 The World Fact Book (2005). Saudi Arabia Economy overview. http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/ja.html, last modified 1st November 2005. Accessed 24.11.05 14 The World Fact Book (2005). Saudi Arabia Economy overview. http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/ja.html, last modified 1st November 2005. Accessed 24.11.05 15Sheppard, E and Barnes, T (2003) A Companion to Economic Geography, Blackwell publishers. ...read more.

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