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Discuss how far football stadia resemble the roman colosseum in their provisions for spectators.

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Introduction

Discuss how far football stadia resemble the roman colosseum in their provisions for spectators. Modern football stadiums owe very little to the colosseum in the architectural sense mainly due to the fact that the roman builders would have found it impossible to build in stone or roman cement. How they do resemble the colosseum is the impact that they have on the environment around them, expressing the wealth and status of the club it belongs to. The colosseum and modern day football stadiums are designed to cope with problems that do arise, these are as follows, the accommodation of very large numbers of people, a good view of the spectacle, crowd safety and control all of which are modern day problems for football stadiums. These are the elements that are classed I feel as functions of the colosseum and football stadiums. The access ramps in modern stadiums reflect those of the colosseum, because the routes of access for spectators determined the exterior of the building. The lack of pillars between any spectators or the spectacle this is how visibility is maintained for everyone. ...read more.

Middle

He enjoys the games; from the one article you could class him as overly complimentary which could be construed as slightly sarcastic if it was not for the content of the rest of the article. Apuleius does not seem to like the games; He feels they are a horrible spectacle. In the "Ass in the arena", even the ass seems to be thinking what this spectacle is about and also feeling shame. Although if the ass was a spectator rather than a participant we get the feeling he may actually enjoy the games and the scene that is about to happen. In the "Robbers tale" Apuleius leaves us with no doubt that he finds the games distasteful, wasteful and decadent. He feels they are an exercise in vanity. The three scholars that I have chosen are all reasonably similar in their attitudes towards the games. I have chosen two who dislike the games and think them wasteful and decadent, while one that I have chosen seems to like them, but the way he writes about them could also be construed as overly fawning and could also be seen as a sarcastic view of the games and what is wrong with them. ...read more.

Conclusion

He talks about how an unconvicted innocent participant may be punished as it is impossible to control the beasts and that they will not know who is innocent and who is guilty. The ass is thinking this in a selfish manner, as he does not want to die. He speaks about the crowd are spell bound by the spectacle and the sensual pleasure. This story shows the shame that the ass is feeling in having to engage in the act, but you also get the feeling that if the ass was a spectator not a participant he may have actually enjoyed the scene. In the "Robbers tale" it talks of the fine appearance and quantity of the beasts. The showy spectacle employed all the trappings of his inheritance to collect a large amount of bears. It also then talks of envy and that the bears become ill and reduced to nothing, leaving the carcasses in the streets. He sees this I think of wasteful and shows human nature as people tried to outdo each other by presenting him with bears as gifts. I think this is a swipe at the waste of life that the games involve. Joanna Murphy Y152858X TMA03 ...read more.

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