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'How would you perform the role of Antigone in her final appearance of the play and what effects would you hope to create for the audience?'

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Introduction

'How would you perform the role of Antigone in her final appearance of the play and what effects would you hope to create for the audience?' I would choose a thrust stage format for the final appearance of Antigone. This would bring the audience into the action and allow the chorus to be divided around the stage. An aisle running in the middle of the audience will suffice for her grand entrance and exit. I would dress Antigone in simple sand coloured dress wearing no shoes or sandals and her hair worn up, out of her face so the world can see that she is for real and not ashamed of her actions. The bare feet would symbolise Antigone going back to her roots while the simple cloth proves how she no longer needs or cares about material belongings. At the beginning of this scene Antigone would enter from the back of the hall, up through the centre aisle to the stage. She would be at the centre of a group of soldiers with her hands tied together by ropes held by the soldiers. This entrance will give the impression of sincerity to the audience showing how important the crime she committed was in the eye of the law. ...read more.

Middle

I would emphasize the words 'Beat', 'doomed', wasted and died' and finally 'such is the sleep I shall go to'. This will add to the image of how hideous death will be and arouse pity from the audience. Group A from the chorus will speak the following stanza only to add variation to the speeches. It would be spoken slowly and carefully at Antigone to make sense of her response, 'Mockery, mockery!' The guards would still be marching on the spot, tugging roughly every so often on the ropes showing no pity towards her. Antigone would react by stumbling and resisting , but no mercy will be shown encouraging the arousing of pity for her. As Antigone I would speak with anger at the chorus as I cried out 'O lordly sons of my city!..' as if cursing them. 'No friend to weep at my banishment..' would be spoken with a realisation of how lonely her life has been and how cold her death shall be, again arousing pity. The chorus group to Antigones' left would say, 'My child you have gone your way to the outermost limit..' as if being the word of the truth and reasoning. 'This is the expiation you must make...' will be spoken altogether to emphasize that how the curse of her family has affected her. ...read more.

Conclusion

The pace would be slow and dream-like until 'O but I would not have done the forbidden thing...' which would be spoken with determination and conviction. I would angrily question 'What law of heaven have I transgressed?' proving I had done no wrong in the eyes of God whereas 'What god (pause) can save me now?' would be spoken slowly, arms and head lifted to the sky, proving that there was no other fate but death and how no one can save her now. The lights would slowly lift as the rest of the cast become unfrozen. The chorus would begin their line in unison,' Still the same tempest heart..' as the guards slowly march Antigone down the steps off the theatre. Creon would be standing, arms folded, legs hip-width apart conveying solidarity as he says 'Indeed there is no more to hope for.' Antigones' exit would be similar of that to her entrance yet she would be followed by a spotlight until the end of her lines where there would be a final blackout. Her head would be raised though conveying how she is no longer afraid emphasizing admiration. As Antigone I would speak boldly emphasizing the last sentence of the stanza. '............................................because I honoured Those things that to which honour truly belongs.' On the final blackout the stage will be empty except the frozen chorus on stage which will leave a tense and anticipated atmosphere. Alex Webborn 5th December 2003 ...read more.

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