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The Seven Deadly Sins: Response Phase

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Introduction

Seven Deadly Sins Stimulus The stimulus we were given was The Seven Deadly sins which we interpreted in different ways. We started the workshop on "x" November and continued to study it for 8 drama lessons. I had previous knowledge of the stimulus and knew that they are immoral faults committed by man in different forms. When I researched the seven deadly sins into more depth I found that there were many different names for each sin, they derive from the Christian bible and they are the opposites of the Seven Virtues. When in class we decided on the names and terms we would use collectively so not to get confused when referring to them. Greed: This is where you want more than you need such as money or food. Sloth/Laziness: Being idle and not excelling at your talents. Lust: Sexual desires that you shouldn't be having. Wrath: Can be defined as either losing your temper easily or being angry generally. Envy: This is where you are jealous of something that is beyond your reach, for example hair or personality. ...read more.

Middle

Our facial expressions showed that we were happy with what we saw in the mirror. For the second still image we were told show it in an abstract way. As we only showed the vanity side to the pride sin we decided to add in the other part of the definition, thinking that you are more important than others around you. I stood in the front with my arms out showing that I was more important than the other two characters. Karimah, sitting down, looked at me with her facial expression showing that she thinks that she is better than me and Anjelah still looked in her mirror, sitting down, to show vanity. When I became the sculptor for this still image I found that the audience might no be able to distinguish what character Karimah was performing as, so I told her to stand up and put her hand on her hip to enhance her typical character traits. These still images helped me to understand that every moment in a play counts and every gesture and expression needs to be performed accurately to show different sins. ...read more.

Conclusion

Once we had made our storyline and were part-way through rehearsing, I thought it would best if Sophie stood on her chair to symbolise that she took the higher ground and I crouched and moved low to show that I was closer to "hell". When I successfully persuaded Rachel to steal, I thought that I should push Sophie off the chair to show that I had won and to break from the thought-track. This strategy helped me to understand that a thought-track can be a powerful moment in the play, deepen the audience's knowledge of the play and tell much more than a plain piece of drama. Narrating Narration is where one or many individuals provide a spoken commentary that accompanies the drama or a story being related by a character. For the second lesson, we were told to bring in various objects which we thought best described one of the sins. I brought in two objects; a money calculator to represent greed or envy and a television remote control to represent sloth. I had to talk about each item for one minute. I explained that the calculator could be interpreted as more than one sin. ...read more.

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