• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

‘The Great Gatsby’ Is often thought of as a novel which reflects the glamour of America in the 1920’s. Do you consider this to be an accurate reading of the novel?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

'The Great Gatsby' Is often thought of as a novel which reflects the glamour of America in the 1920's. Do you consider this to be an accurate reading of the novel? The novel 'The Great Gatsby' cannot be said to only reflect an image of American glamour, but of the entire American dream. It is a social commentary, an ironic satire, a dark prediction and a romantic drama, each factor combining to produce a book covering many themes, involving the individual and the whole. It presents views of America from both the inside and out, creating complex microcosms within itself, each reinforced through repetition from the first page to the last. In doing this Fitzgerald wrote a carefully structured novel, and rewrote and changed many chapters in order to expand the plot past a mere chronological order of events. "It is worth bearing in mind the care that went into the revision of the work because it is deceptively easy to read the novel quickly in order to find out what has happened as we do in a detective story." - J.F.Wyatt* In the very first few pages the reader is introduced to the narrator of the book. Even this early on the idea self-improvement and wonderful opportunities is a key factor. Nick Carraway who is of a "prominent, well to do family" is restless in the West, and wishes to strive out to the East and be a 'bondsman'. He has come back from the war, and discovered that "instead of being the warm centre of the world, the middle-west now seemed like the ragged edge of the universe". ...read more.

Middle

That Nick has seen the 'inside' of these people is fundamental, as they can be taken as the epitome of glamour in the book, in which case it is not necessarily something to be desired. In terms of 'The American Dream', I think that Gatsby had it. This is not revealed to us at the beginning of the novel, instead Gatsby is a mysterious figure, someone you caught glimpses of but were never fully revealed. "I saw that I was not alone, a figure had emerged from the shadow of my neighbours mansion...... he stretched out his arms towards the dark water in a curious way, and, as far as I was away from him, I could have sworn he was trembling.......when I looked once more again for Gatsby he had vanished, and I was alone again in the unquiet darkness" The revelations about Gatsby occur at intervals in the book, breaking up Nick's chronological narrative and providing snippets of information, keeping us interested. J.F.Wyatt* says "Nick is taken to New York by the great man himself and on the journey he reveals tantalising fragments of his past." The next thing we are presented with to do with Gatsby is the speculation of various people at his parties. "Somebody told me they thought he killed a man once" "It's more that he was a German spy during the war" These comments have to be taken in the context of which they are said though. Nick himself whilst at the time half believing these stories about this mysterious man also analyses the situation, his thoughts being:- "It was testimony to the romantic speculation he inspired that there were whispers about him from those who found little that it was necessary to whisper about in this world.". ...read more.

Conclusion

That is very interesting as he is not, due to his involvement in crime, adultery and using of Nick. This means that at a first glance, Gatsby is a true example of the American dream. He is very wealthy and has made it all himself, is generous and flash. Gatsby's willingness to protect Daisy from anything, is also his downfall. His death is due to his placing of his trust in an imperfect character. In Gatsby's mind, his sheltering of Daisy from responsibility of Myrtle's death can only be a good thing as he is helping the woman he loves. In reality, the world does not work like that and he is only setting himself up to reap the repercussions and tempt Daisy to revert to her secure husband and feel safe without him. "He put his hands in his coat pockets and turned back eagerly to his scrutiny of the house, as though my presence marred the sacredness of the vigil. So I walked away and left him standing there in the moonlight - watching over nothing." If the glamour is to be Gatsby and his parties, then this novel could be thought to incorporate a social commentary on 'high-society', and 'glamour' and wealth. If Tom and Daisy provide the glamour, then it is a deeply pessimistic book, as they are shallow characters, whose whole attitude is summed up by their running away in the end. Therefore; This novel is not a romantic reflection into the glamour of any era. It is a story of the perversity of the world in that a dream however noble, can be warped and ruined by both the holder of the dream and those careless and responsible around them. The American Dream does exist, but if you are not careful, at what cost. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE F. Scott Fitzgerald section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE F. Scott Fitzgerald essays

  1. Gatsby's introduction in The Great Gatsby, seems very solemn and Nick comments that Gatsby ...

    The lower classes are also generally used as a dumping ground by the higher classes, in that in The Great Gatsby, the members of the higher classes tend to ruin the lives of those in lower social classes, namely George Wilson.

  2. "What qualities of Daisy from the 'Great Gatsby' and Nora from 'A Dolls House' ...

    Linde, her true motivation in life is revealed. "I did get pleasure from sitting and working and earning money. It felt like...like being a man". Unlike Daisy, Nora doesn't want to accept the fact that she lives in a prevailingly male-oriented society, and in the end her intellectual drive motivates

  1. How effective is Nick Carraways first person narrative technique in The Great Gatsby?

    straight from Gatsbys mouth instead of people talking about him lie the first three chapters where we only learn what is said by others talking of him. In the first chapter Nick talks about himself. He says that he is from a prominent Midwestern family and graduated from Yale.

  2. Corruption of the American Dream in The Great Gatsby.

    Rather than becoming immoral from wealth as Tom has, Gatsby engages in criminal activity as his only path to being rich. His need for money had become so great that he "was in the drug business" (Fitzgerald 95). Furthermore, he lies to Nick about his past in order to cover up his criminal activity.

  1. How much do we learn about Gatsby's character and how is it revealed to ...

    His shady business dealings and conflicting stories about the origins of his money also force the reader to pay closer attention to it. Though Gatsby himself is this shady to disguise this dealing. Later in the book the truth does emerge from him and this is an indication of their

  2. How Has Fitzgerald Presented The Character Of Daisy In 'The Great Gatsby'?

    Scott Fitzgerald depicts Daisy as a weak mother figure, revealing yet another flaw in her character. She treats her child as more of an accessory that she uses to show off to her friends when they come round, as when Nick first meets Daisy in the novel she says 'irrelevantly'; "You ought to see the baby".

  1. Great Gatsby Reading Questions and answers.

    In new you're the early summer was in the month of June. As to the day it was around two weeks before the longest day of the year. The day was roughly around 4th to 10th. 4. Describe Nick. What facts do you know about him, and what do you infer about him?

  2. Daisy describes Tom Buchanan as a brute. To what extent does your reading of ...

    Tom is very racist and worries that immigrants will challenge his privileged existence. He fears that ?the white race will be utterly submerged? and he is scared that the traditional class system where he?s on top might collapse and the ?new rich? will take over.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work