• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

A Christmas Carol Coursework. Dickens describes Scrooge as as solitary as an oyster. By comparing him to a creature that only rarely comes out, it shows how lonely and anti-social he really is, making the readers grow a stronger dislike for him.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

English Coursework: A Christmas Carol The book, A Christmas Carol, was written by Charles Dickens in 1843, and is the story of Ebenezer Scrooge and his change in attitude to Christmas and poor people from a strong dislike to seeing the error of his ways and joins in with the festive season. In the book, Scrooge changes dramatically after meeting four ghosts: Marley, his old business partner and the ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Yet To Come. Marley tells him that he must change his ways in order to save himself from the fate Marley himself is suffering, and after the three ghosts take him to various parts of his life, he knows that he must change from who he was and so he does. Some of Dickens' ideas about society are inferred in this story. Scrooge represents what Dickens did not like about real, rich people of his time. As Dickens was poor as a child, because his father was sent to prison so he had to work for himself at twelve years of age to earn money, his notions about the indifference and selfishness of wealthy people arose and he despaired over the suffering of the poor, and Scrooge's traits show everything he did not like about these people, and what he changes into is what he hoped other rich people would become in real life. ...read more.

Middle

When the Ghost of Christmas Past takes him to his old workplace, where he was an apprentice, his old boss Fezziwig is compared with him and highlights his bad character. When Fezziwig says 'Yo ho my boys' and wishes 'him or her a merry Christmas', it shows the direct contrast to Scrooge as Fezziwig is so merry and enthusiastic about Christmas whereas Scrooge has a strong hatred for it. 'My boys' suggests that Fezziwig is quite close to Dick and Scrooge, which not only shows that Scrooge did have friends and good relations but also it emphasizes how lonely and anti-social he is now. In Stave II, Fezziwig says 'No more work tonight. Christmas Eve, Dick. Christmas, Ebenezer!' Not only does his strong excitement highlight the difference between him Scrooge, but what he says about closing up early is almost the complete opposite to what Scrooge had said before, when he never made any allowances except when he unwillingly gave his clerk the day off for Christmas: 'But I suppose you must have the whole day. Be here all the earlier in the morning.' Here Dickens gives us the impression of how mean and avaricious he really was, and by comparing him with Fezziwig, it really emphasizes this dislike for Christmas. At the present time, particularly at the Cratchit's house, a change in Scrooge is seen. At first the impression we are given is that, like before, characteristics between Scrooge and others are being contrasted together to highlight ...read more.

Conclusion

So, after analysing parts of the book, I think that Dickens was trying to give us the impression that Scrooge was a... but changes when he realises the true meaning of Christmas, that it's not about wealth but rather being with family and kindness, which was the message of the novel and what Dickens wanted to happen in real life. We see this change gradually progressing through the main structure of the book: the four ghosts each representing one of the four parts of Scrooge's accumulating change. After each part or ghost, Marley and the ghosts of Past, Present and Yet To Come, the change in Scrooge from cold and spiteful to loving and kind develops on itself further from before he had met that ghost, until the after last ghost and his transformation is complete. As there are a lot of contextual ideas from Dickens, I think there is an intended message that had derived from this novel. I think that Dickens wanted people, particularly the wealthy, to realise that they did have responsibilities to look out for not only themselves, but to think of those less fortunate than themselves. He believed that money was only a material want, and greed was not necessary. He wanted this novel to make people realise that mankind and family were better than wealth, especially at Christmas, and uses Scrooge's change in character to model this. ?? ?? ?? ?? Ciara McCoy ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE A Christmas Carol section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE A Christmas Carol essays

  1. Examine how dickens uses the supernatural as a vehicle for change in 'A Christmas ...

    The ghost tells him that they are not his but "mans" and that "this boy is ignorance, this girl is want." Scrooge is told to beware of them both. When he asks if nothing can be done to help them the ghost again quotes his earlier words "are there no prisons?

  2. Explore how Dickens makes his readers aware of poverty in A Christmas Carol.

    of poverty on the poor and that Want is the basic need for human life. Dickens is also appealing to the reader to sympathise with the poor. It also shows the start of Scooge's reformation. The "Doom" that Dickens forewarns of is the potential for civil unrest caused by class divisions with the poor being badly treated.

  1. "What is Dickens message in 'A Christmas Carol' and how does he make it?"

    The ghost is warning Scrooge that if you treat others poorly, then you cannot expect any courtesy or compassion from others yourself. It is even more ironic when Scrooge is horrified at the way this woman is treating the dead mans belongings, saying, "the case of this unhappy man might be my own.

  2. What do you see as Dickens' social aims in 'A Christmas Carol' and how ...

    the situation but choose not to, and tries to show them what they look like to others - a powerful figure, but cold and heartless - like Marley's ghost. He is also described to have chains attached to him - to symbolise the weight on society that he has caused by acting the way he did in life.

  1. To What Extent does Dickens's 'A Christmas Carol' fit into the Genre of the ...

    When the family moved to London from Portsmouth most of the family's furniture had to be sold to pay off their debts. In 1834 a Poor Law was passed which stated that all poor people had to either go into a workhouse, pay off their debt or get another job.

  2. A Christmas Carol - Marley's Ghost.

    felt that in the event of its being impossible, it might involve the necessity of an embarrassing explanation. But the Ghost sat down on the opposite side of the fireplace, as if he were quite used to it. 'You don't believe in me,' observed the Ghost. 'I don't,' said Scrooge.

  1. Analysis of how the character "Scrooge" changes as "A Christmas Carol" progresses.

    It would have made him realise some of the extent of his loneliness and unpopularity, as well as disturbing him to see the husband and the girl he once loved talking so badly of him. This is also of great relation to Scrooge starting to realise that money isn't as important as some other things in life.

  2. The novel 'A Christmas Carol', by Charles

    The rich people were the equivalent to Scrooge. He uses Scrooge to show the wilful ignorance of the rich. Although Scrooge can afford to support the poor, he only does this through paying his taxes which go towards the workhouses and treadmill.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work