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A comparison of 2 war poems "The send-Off" and "Ducle et decorum est".

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Introduction

A comparison of 2 war poems "The send-Off" and "Ducle et decorum est" All Wilfred Owens's poems seem to rhyme. The ends of the alternate lines rhyme in most all of his poems for example in "The send off" The 1st line ends in way and the 3rd in gay. This is repeated with other rhyming words all through the poem. On the 7th and 9th lines the rhyme is tramp and camp. In "Ducle et decorum est" we can see the same format of rhyming. The end of each alternate line rhymes i.e. the ends of the 1st and 3rd lines in this case sacks and backs, and the end of the 9th and 10th lines fumbling and stumbling. Both these poems were written in the 1st world war and are by the author Wilfred Owen who died seven days before the end of the first world war. Both suggest that the out come of the war was grim for the vast majority of solders who if they came home at all would ether return home dead or injured. ...read more.

Middle

"Nor there if they yet mock what women meant Who gave them flowers" The quote "Shall they return to beating bells" on line 16 is almost asking a question. Will they return? I think this shows us that Wilfred Owens's view of war from personal experience tells us that he hated the war and saw it as a grim affair. The next quote tell us that he saw the men as dead as soon as they got on the train. "Their breasts were stuck all white with wreath and spray As men's are dead" The next quote has an oxymoron in it Grimly gay. "And lined the train with faces grimly gay" By doing this Wilfred Owen tells us that the solders that are lining the train are happy but this is shadowed by the fact that they are going to war and may not becoming back this makes the title seem ironic "The Send-off" I feel that this implying that they may not come back and they have been sent off into the unknown. "We never heard to which front these were sent." ...read more.

Conclusion

In Line 2 of Dulce et decorum Est Owen mentions "we" and I feel that this implies that he is writing from personal experience and not from something that he has seen while he was in the trenches. This is both his view and the view of his men as he says "we". "Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through the sludge" Both these poems leave the reader with a melancholy thought in the send off Wilfred Owen describes the solders coming home to a village they do not know and in dulce et decorum est he says that dulce et decorum est is a lie and that we shouldn't tell our children that its sweet and fitting to die for ones country. I like the way the last line is short in both poems it gives the poem more of an impact. I think that Wilfred Owen is trying to bring the horrors of war to the reader in the last verse of each poem. In dulce et decorum est he asks the reader if they could follow the wagon with the injured solider in and in the send off he relates the solders return to the village and asks how many are going to come home. ...read more.

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