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A View From The Bridge.

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Introduction

A View From The Bridge Annie Davies 10c/v The play 'A View from the Bridge' is set in the late forties in Red Hook, "a slum facing the bay on the seaward side of Brooklyn Bridge...the gullet of New York." It is a poor community, consisting in large part of Italian immigrant relying on the uncertain livelihood on work at the docks Life wasn't easy. The area is Italian-American, and therefore has very strict catholic morals, values and social conventions. Immediately Eddie, a forty year old, husky slightly overweight man is introduced to the audience. Eddie is fundamentally a simple, straightforward guy who works on the piers when there was work brought home his pay, and he lived. Family orientated, and very hardworking, Eddie likes to feel in control of him self, his home and the people around him and because of this he will not allow himself to be criticized. He likes his evolving world to stay the same and faces tremendous problems, as Catherine grows... He lives with his wife, Beatrice, a simple good woman whose problems seen incidental to the major tragedy of the play. He is Catherine's uncle but he behaves as a father and a friend to her, already at our first sight of them together, iwe can see an intense relatinshiprelationship. But what exactly does he feel towards her? . In addition, a neutral character helps the audience understand the complex views of the characters, explaining the ups and downs of the Carbone family. He is a symbolic bridge between American law and tribal laws. He is a well-educated man who studies and respects American law but is still loyal to Italian traditions. Alfieri introduces Eddie with a brief speech, and then the story begins. From his narration, it seems that Alfieri has decided to tell the story for his own reasons as much as anyone else's. ...read more.

Middle

not to irritate his benefactor, Eddie he walks over the atmosphere now feeling ever so tense makes it certain that Eddie knows he isn't weak mentally or physically. Catherine asks Rodolpho to dance and the song is still Paper Doll. Then asks can you lift the chair using only one hand, Eddie asked puzzled 'what do you mean?' but when he fails to do this, Marco stands up, bends down, takes hold of the chair leg, and lifts it slowly above his head 'like a weapon'. Eddie seems quite intimidated by this, and back down sheepishly, Marco changes his expression from a 'glare of warning' into a 'smile of triumph' this scares Eddie, his grin evaporates as he takes in Marco "scowl" Eddie maybe thinking this way of getting to Rodolpho is not a good route around, if Eddie causes problems with Rodolpho then he has Marco to deal with. This act comes to an end, it leaves the edge of seat effect and that's why this part is so affective what is going to happen next? Rodolpho has not been hired to work the docks and takes the advantage of this to spend the day at home with Catherine. He shows more confidence and maturity here now that he is alone with Catherine. Catherine talks about moving away back to where Rodolpho live in Italy, he thinks it is rather foolish; there is nothing there for her or for him. But her reason is not just to see Italy; there is a more sinister reason. Catherine says 'I'm afraid of Eddie here.' She is shrewd enough to see that Eddie could ruin their marriage, while at the same time being generous enough to admit what he has done for her. She is clever enough to know that Eddie can be deceived ('tell him you'd live in Italy-just tell him') and loving enough to want to be happy. ...read more.

Conclusion

still this is all links to the feeling that he had over his lack of authority in the community and even his own home. I think that what Catherine an d Beatrice feel is that they have lost someone very special, but they new either way that this was going to happen, Beatrice has lost her husband and Catherine her father figure, there feelings seem endless and sorrowful. As we can see in the last seen, Beatrice is truly in love with this man, when she covers him with her body. Also Catherine's last words where an apology to Eddie. Alfieri reflects back on the events on the play, who recognises the death of Eddie Carbone should serve a reminder to those who must carry on, and to the audience that 'it is better to settle for half, it must be' Eddie is then the subject of the calamity- not that it is heroic or understanding figure in the play, but he is the one with the most character and problem the audience has most fully known, the one whose force has driven the tragedy. It is obvious that Miller shows Eddie Carbone as a tragic hero in 'A view From the Bridge'. In the conclusion of the play only two people keep their respect for him, his wife Beatrice and Alfieri. 'I confess that sometimes perversley pure calls to me from his memory - not purely good, but himself purely, for he allowed himself to be wholly know and for that I think I love him more than all my sensible clients.' It is brought more to our attention of Eddie being a tragic hero because of the ease of his character. Even though he does become vicious, Eddie isn't two-faced towards other people and he is a man of principles. It is probably his problem of not taking notice of what is happening in his life and also being an open character, you can see his reasons for doing something straight away. ...read more.

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