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a view from the bridge-How does Miller use Eddie to create dramatic tension for the audience?

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Introduction

A View From The Bridge by Arthur Miller How does Miller use Eddie to create dramatic tension for the audience? In the play, "A View From The Bridge", Arthur Miller gave the audience an impression that the Italian immigrants weren't welcome to the USA. The scene is set in New York and it relates to six main characters, who are all individuals and play unique roles. Arthur Miller was born on October 17th in 1915 in New York City. He was a prominent figure in American literature and his career as a writer spanned over seven decades. He is considered by audiences as one of Americas' greatest play writers, and his plays are widely recognised throughout the world. The play is set in Red Hook. The main focus and stage is the Carbones' living and dining room. Alfieri thinks that the public do not appreciate lawyers or priests because he says "You see how uneasily they nod to me? That's because I am a lawyer. In this neighbourhood to meet a lawyer or a priest on the street is unlucky. We're only thought of in connection with disasters, and they'd rather not get too close". A slight of distrust lies in the neighbourhood because he can sense that the law wasn't an amicable idea since the Greeks were beaten. People have told him that the neighbourhood lack an element of "elegance and glamour". ...read more.

Middle

Eddie replies directly to Marco. He becomes very aggressive and rude when Rodolfo intervenes. Eddie gets very hostile and snaps back at Rodolfo by saying "I know lemons are green, for Christ's sake, you see them in the store they're green sometimes. I said oranges they paint, I didn't say nothin' about lemons.". Another incident rises when Eddie has a conversation about how he can teach boxing to Rodolfo. Eddie picks on Rodolfo and tries to intimidate and patronise him. They both throw in some light punches but Eddie gets carried away and grazes Rodolfo. Catherine is astonished and Eddie replies "Why? I didn't hurt him. Did I hurt you kid?". Marco had realised that Eddie was bothered by Rodolfo. Marco showed his strength towards Eddie by raising the chair over his head. He does this to make Eddie aware that if anything happens to Rodolfo, Eddie will have to pay the consequences. Arthur Miller shows that Marco has had enough and understands what's going on, the stage directions describes Marco with "a strained tension gripping his eyes and jaw, his neck stiff", he also used a simile "the chair raised like a weapon over Eddie's head". Eddie then realises what Marco meant, his "grin vanishes as he absorbs his looks.". This shows us that Marco's hamartia is Rodolfo. Eddie was "knocked off for Christmas early". ...read more.

Conclusion

But don't come back. You be on my side or on their side, that's all". Rodolfo comes to warn Eddie to escape from there, as Marco is in the church praying to God, to forgive him for his future sins. Eddie is adamant and will not leave his house. When Marco appears shouting out Eddie's name, Eddie assumes that he is coming to apologize. However, the fight breaks out between Eddie and Marco. Eddie raises a knife to Marco but Marco in self-defence turns the blade into Eddie. His death proved his weakness for Catherine and that his hamartia was still evident. As well as Alfieri, Eddie also knew that a fight was going to occur and either Marco or himself was going to pay the consequence of their hamartia. There is a certain feel of tension when Eddie is present with the characters involved and the audience. He is very unpredictable, he is likeable and shows signs of caring in some scenes and sometimes aggressive and violent in other scenes. Overall, Eddie creates apprehension and an un-relaxed atmosphere throughout the whole play. Alfieri, in a way shows signs of mixed feelings about Eddie's death, we know this because he says "Most of the time now we settle for half and I like it better. But the truth is holy, and even as I know how wrong he was, and his death useless, I tremble, for I confess that something perversely pure calls to me from his memory". ?? ?? ?? ?? Richa Patel 10.9 1 ...read more.

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