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"About a boy". Explain how Nick Hornby creates conflict on one's self identity through the interactions of relationships.

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Introduction

Explain how Nick Hornby creates conflict on one's self identity through the interactions of relationships. When one develops a relationship with another, their interactions can create conflict in many ways. Although the major and basic type of conflict which involve relationships are disagreements or arguments, another type of conflict can involve one's self-identity, often giving a great influence or impact on the individual. Conflict on one's self identity arise a theme Growing Up as one's self-identity can change from maturing from their surroundings. It also develops the theme Identity as one may struggle with their self-identity because they may not fit in socially. These dominant themes are explored in the novel 'About a Boy' by Nick Hornby and are explored to demonstrate to the audience of what relationships can hold on each individual. Growing Up is not always based on humans physically, but also mentally. This means it can not only relate to young kids but also adults as they sometimes fail to overcome or mature with their surroundings. ...read more.

Middle

Also, Rachel helps and influences Will to become more mature with his lies and responsibilities. This is shown in the quote 'Suddenly Will was fearful. He had never had any kind of intuition or empathy or connection in his life before, but he had it now.' Hornby's use of characterisation in making Marcus form relationships with Will and for Will to like Rachel helps to ruminate over his self-identity. Likewise, Fiona, who is Marcus's suicidal mother, is suffering from great depression and is too occupied in her own love life. This drags on to the extent in where she does not realise Marcus has a difficult time as well. Her signs of depression can be seen on her note given to Marcus before her suicidal attempt, which is a symbol of Fiona's selfishness. This eventually leads to Marcus becoming more responsible by taking care of Fiona and leads Fiona to lose her name as a mother. Her selfishness can also be seen through the dialogue between Fiona and Will. ...read more.

Conclusion

This brought Marcus to turn to Will for his true thoughts and feelings: 'I don't know what I need. Only Will knows what I need.' This is also interpreting that Marcus doesn't know what to do with his life as he is puzzled and confused in himself. His level of conformity brings others to bully and omit him from the social world which Will realises and helps to try and change Marcus's habits and appearance. With a mother who is locking herself up with her sorrows, and the rude attitudes that are given to Marcus at school, causes a pinnacle and most difficult turning point in Marcus's life since he has to become independent and responsible. Independent, since he does not have anyone to rely on for his social life and responsible for his mother, since he cannot live the usual standards of normal families with a suicidal mother. Thus, relationships can cause conflict on one's self identity by interactions between humans. This is clearly demonstrated in 'About a Boy' through the themes Growing Up and Identity and the characters Will, Fiona and Marcus. ...read more.

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