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According To Critics Popular Culture Is: Superficial Formula Based

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Introduction

According To Critics Popular Culture Is: * Superficial * Formula Based * Mass Produced For Cheapness * Standardised Using examples explore the strengths and weaknesses of this argument. Culture has never been given a specific meaning; there are many different things that people perceive culture as. The difference between high culture and popular culture is frequently a matter of taste or judgement. Popular culture has been a problem for as long as there has been something called "popular culture." High culture according to some has durability i.e. it lasts for a long period of time for example: Beethoven, Mona Lisa, Mozart and Leonardo De Vinci. ...read more.

Middle

audience and get them watching each episode, or buy the product this is so that they can keep making more of the same ideas and it gets cheaper. Cross over culture is a mixture of high culture and popular culture. It keeps alive the high culture and enriches popular culture. E.g. Pavarotti Luciano - Nessun Dorma at a football match. A further example was classic music to sell products and used to introduce TV programmes e.g. Inspector Morse Popular culture, or pop culture is the vernacular (people's) culture that prevails in a modern society. ...read more.

Conclusion

pop culture subject is actually the leading eduge of what eventually evolves into a part of a society's every day culture or subculture (ie. television, internet). Television has made an impact on Popular Culture in huge ways. The concept of the television itself, and the lifestyle changes it caused as its popularity soared into the mainstream in the 1950's indicate that the T.V. stands on its own as one of the biggest mediums of pop culture influence. So overall I think what the critics are saying is 100% right about culture although it is underestimated, being standardised to a certain standard which people expect. ?? ?? ?? ?? Rick Green - Communication Studies ...read more.

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