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Act 2, scene 2 is an important section of the play. Explain how suspense is created in this scene. Describe how you think the part of Macbeth should be played to show how he reacts to events, and how his relationship with Lady Macbeth develops the scene

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Introduction

Act 2, scene 2 is an important section of the play. Explain how suspense is created in this scene. Describe how you think the part of Macbeth should be played to show how he reacts to events, and how his relationship with Lady Macbeth develops In this scene. Macbeth is about a man, Macbeth, who is the Thane of Glamis, it tells us of how Macbeth becomes Thane of Cawdor and then King and the treacherous things he does to gain these titles. Shakespeare wrote the play in the summer of 1606. The importance of witchcraft was that James the 1st had a lot of interest in the topic so Shakespeare added it to impress the king. Before Act 2, scene 2 we are told of the battle led by Macbeth and Banquo "against Macdonwald and his band of rebels; and then against the Norwegians and the Scottish traitor, the Thane of Cawdor." Then there are the three witches prophecies; "All hail, Macbeth! Hail to thee Thane of Glamis. ...read more.

Middle

The lighting would be situated where the moon is. There would be a dim light focusing on Macbeth and Lady Macbeth, and a bright light where the moon is casting dark moving shadows from the trees. The trees would be rustling with a fan on them or something. There would be background noise of violent thunder coming from the skies above. The atmosphere would be very tense as Macbeth and Lady Macbeth are having a violent argument, because Macbeth comes back from Duncan's room with his hand covered in blood. "So brainsickly of things. Go, get some water. And wash this filthy witness from your hand." I would create the scene like this because Macbeth is very uneasy due to what he has done, so the effects I described would create a perfect atmosphere to make him 'jumpy' and scared. "I have done the deed. Didst thoust not hear a noise?" this is said by Macbeth when he arrives back at his castle and meets Lady Macbeth in the courtyard. To this Lady Macbeth replies "I heard the owl scream and the cricket cry. Did you not speak?" ...read more.

Conclusion

The voice continued "still it cried, 'sleep no more!' To all the house:'glamis hath murder'd sleep, and therefore Cawdor shall sleep no more, Macbeth shall sleep no more!" this shows that it is really getting to Macbeth. In those two sentences from Macbeth there is a great repetition of the word sleep. Act 2, scene 2 is an important part of the play as it shows the true character of Macbeth and Lady Macbeth. Macbeth is a strong, brave man on the battlefield but when killing his friend to become King it shows us that he has feelings and is not as cold blooded as first thought, we know this because he is showing guilt for what he has done. Whereas Lady Macbeth does not seem to be affected at all by what she has assisted in doing. She remains unaffected by all that has occurred and tells Macbeth what to do, this shows that she is cold blooded and will do anything to help Macbeth achieve greatness. Even if it is not what he wants to do, she will do her best to convince him that it is the right thing to do. ...read more.

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