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All plays need to be understood by an audience, a director makes sure that a story is understood, in Romeo and Juliet many points in the story need to be given to the audience so it is understood.

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Introduction

All plays need to be understood by an audience, a director makes sure that a story is understood. This is achieved by expressing different things, for example props, stage and characters. In Romeo and Juliet many points in the story need to be given to the audience so it is understood. In Act three scene four I would begin by directing the actors to be on the stage. The actor playing Capulet and Paris will be dressed in rich red and gold to show their wealth and importance, but Capulet in a nightgown as the scene as the scene is set at night. Lady Capulet will be wearing an expensive nightdress also to show wealth. The scene will be set outside in a yard with torches and trees, near the door to the Capulet house, to make a nightly atmosphere. Dilect is very important to express the character, Capulet is very powerful, cold hearted and intends to make his daughter marry Paris for her welfare. When Capulet says, " well we were born to die" he will say it with shrugged shoulders and a deep voice to show that he has overcome Tybalts death quickly and in a cold hearted way. ...read more.

Middle

The lights will be dim to show it is dawn, but a spotlight on Romeo and Juliet to show their own dream world and Romantic music will be playing to create a romantic atmosphere. A noise similar to a lark will be played the volume of the music will decrease and the stage lights will become brighter and the spotlight will dim to show the sun is rising and Romeo and Juliet's world is dying. Romeo and Juliet will be close together, flirting. When Romeo says "It was the lark...or stay and die" he will let go of Juliet and stare into nothing so it looks like he is thinking, Juliet will hold him and bring him back to reality and to show she wants him to stay with her. When Romeo has to go, the balcony will be represented by a large window at the end of the stage. Romeo must quickly go to the back of the stage so before he exits the scene (when he is talking to Juliet) it sounds like he is in the distance away from Juliet. ...read more.

Conclusion

When Capulet says "soft take me with you..." he will begin in a confusing voice as Capulet thinks he is doing the right things for his daughter, his voice will sound furious when he says "how,how,how..." to show the audience that he is still thinking but he thinks that Juliet does not appreciate his wishes. When he says "My fingers itch" he will make a fist to show how disgusted he is. The nurse is a strong character so when she says "God in heaven bless her " she will shout, this shows the nurse is stronger than Lady Capulet and is not scared of the consequences that may be given to her, maybe by Capulet. The last mood is betrayal. Juliet is crying, she is weeping into the bed, the nurse is not looking at Juliet, she is looking out of the window and she says "O he's a lovely gentleman". Juliet will look up and the audience will see a surprised disgusted face, to show Juliet does not like the idea. At the end of the scene the last words will not be said by Juliet but an early backstage recording, being played so it seems that she is thinking and so she will show different expressions. James Kuspisz Romeo and Juliet coursework ...read more.

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