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An Analysis of Bathsheba’s Character

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Introduction

An Analysis of Bathsheba's Character Bathsheba is decisive, brisk and businesslike whilst dealing with the paying of the farm workers in chapter 10. She is very confident; "I have formed a resolution to have no bailiff at all". The farm workers are astonished at this; "The men expired an audible breath of amazement". "I shall be up before you are awake, I shall be afield before you are up, and I shall have breakfasted before you are afield. In short I shall astonish you all". This phrasing and rhythm is very strong and very convincing. This speech again shows her confidence and her ability to cope. Bathsheba is the only female in the corn exchange ("the single one of her sex that the room contained") but does not seem to mind. "'Tis a handsome maid, however, and she'll soon get picked up". Here the people in the corn market are discussing Bathsheba and assume that she will get married and hand over the farm for her husband to get picked up. This chapter alone shows that Bathsheba has a hard task ahead of her because of the men's views of a woman farmer. The farm workers are convinced that she will "bring them all to the bad". She goes against traditional ways; "Why only yesterday she cut a rasher of bacon the longways of the flitch!" ...read more.

Middle

Boldwood quickly goes from being indifferent about Bathsheba to being jealous of her. In chapter 19, when Gabriel is talking to Bathsheba, he is "criticising her conduct" and almost preaching at her. She is demurring herself. She does not want her to behave the way that she is. He wants her to stay the way that he has idolised her as. In chapter 22 when Bathsheba has nobly done her best to make amends with Boldwood, Hardy says "the pleasure she derived from the proof that she was idolised". This extract shows two things. One is that it shows that Boldwood is idolising her and the other is that Bathsheba enjoys being idolised (vanity). Bathsheba plays the role of the flirtatious lover. This is shown when Gabriel is proposing to her and she goes along with his proposal and treats it as a game but all along she had no intention of saying yes. Bathsheba is solely interested in Boldwood because he is not interested in her. She is slightly peeved that the most highly respected man in the parish is also the only man who does not look at her. Bathsheba gets slightly "piqued" at this (which encourages her to send the valentine). The way she tosses the hymn book and leaves it to fate if she would send the valentine to Boldwood or not suggests that she wants to ...read more.

Conclusion

In fact he does not even know if she is pretty or not; "Is Miss Everdene considered handsome?" Boldwood quickly goes from being indifferent about Bathsheba to being jealous of her. In chapter 19, when Gabriel is talking to Bathsheba, he is "criticising her conduct" and almost preaching at her. She is demurring herself. She does not want her to behave the way that she is. He wants her to stay the way that he has idolised her as. In chapter 22 when Bathsheba has nobly done her best to make amends with Boldwood, Hardy says "the pleasure she derived from the proof that she was idolised". This extract shows two things. One is that it shows that Boldwood is idolising her and the other is that Bathsheba enjoys being idolised (vanity). Bathsheba also plays the role of the victim. She is the victim of Gabriel's criticism; "I can not allow any man to - to criticise my private conduct". She gets very uptight when she hears the truth about herself; "you are greatly to blame for playing pranks upon a man like Mr Boldwood, merely as a pastime". She feels very indignant that a man, she considers, inferior to her dares to criticise her. When Troy finds Fanny dead he immediately rejects Bathsheba. She becomes "the victim". What has she done to deserve this rejection? She is jealous because Fanny is her rival in love even once she is dead. ] ...read more.

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