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An Inspector Calls -The Inspector's Last Speech in the Play.

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Introduction

An Inspector Calls -The Inspector's Last Speech in the Play The Inspector Calls is a play written in the 1945/1946 by JB Priestley. The play involves the Birling family, a prosperous, higher class, family. They are holding a family dinner party in order to celebrate the engagement of Sheila and Gerald. Into the relaxed warm scene infringes the ruthless character of a police inspector investigating the suicide of a young Eva Smith who also called herself Daisy Renton. Under the demands of the inspectors' investigation, every member of the family turns out to have a shameful underhand, which links them to her death. The Inspector's role in the play is a very influential one. He opens up the characters personalities with his questioning. The inspector leads the characters to confront their own weaknesses, which makes them feel shocked and guilty, getting them to put across there role in the story of the suicide of Eva Smith (Daisy Renton). He is the moral character in the play, in which the audience takes sides with. The physical characteristics of the Inspector as described by Priestley in his notes are that: "The Inspector needs not to be a big man. He is a man in his fifties, dressed plain darkish suit of the period." ...read more.

Middle

In addition, he uses a rhythm of the language, "All intertwined with our lives, with what we think and say and do" It is very serious and has commanding tone about it, which inspires us all to think and look at our lives. This is the determining factor, which tells us, that is this really a speech of a true police inspector? Or Alternatively, is this the ending morality to the play? All the character were firstly shocked by the impact of the speech. However, it is plain that Mr. Birling's motives are to protect himself from social scandal. To do this, he is prepared to he is prepared to distort or ignore the truth and treats this revelation as way to escape the truth of what has happened. He is blind to the hypocrisy, and indifferent when it is pointed out. Just before the end of the play he argues that 'the whole thing is different now', and congratulates himself on having avoided a scandal. Provided their public reputation is safe. Mr. Birling appears to be a hardheaded businessperson who is more concerned with high profits then the welfare of his employees. He thought very highly of himself as he might find his 'way into the next honours list' but regards with contempt the 'cranks' who say that "Everybody should look after everybody else". ...read more.

Conclusion

In the Inspectors last speech he says, "Fire blood and anguish" which I think is dramatic irony from Priestley's writing to add effect and add depth to his whole moral about how people's actions can have serve effects on someone else. The "fire and blood and anguish" is reference to the First and Second World Wars would be very influential to the audience seeming that the play takes place in 1912. The intended effect of the predictions was to make the audience see a glimpse of the kind of person the character is. In the case of Birling, the audience would see him as a character whose opinion is not to be trusted, whereas the predictions made by the Inspector chill the audience and make them see that the lesson he speaks of has been re-taught through fire and blood and anguish twice already. The audiences had experienced the horrors of war and were not eager to experience them again, so they may think that if they followed JB Priestley's message, they would prevent yet another world war. In my opinion the inspectors last speech is the best part in the play because not only do you here the Inspectors final reflection but you also understand Priestley's whole point in writing the play and it adds dramatic depth to the whole meaning of everything that incurs in the play. ...read more.

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