• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

An Inspector Calls -The Inspector's Last Speech in the Play.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

An Inspector Calls -The Inspector's Last Speech in the Play The Inspector Calls is a play written in the 1945/1946 by JB Priestley. The play involves the Birling family, a prosperous, higher class, family. They are holding a family dinner party in order to celebrate the engagement of Sheila and Gerald. Into the relaxed warm scene infringes the ruthless character of a police inspector investigating the suicide of a young Eva Smith who also called herself Daisy Renton. Under the demands of the inspectors' investigation, every member of the family turns out to have a shameful underhand, which links them to her death. The Inspector's role in the play is a very influential one. He opens up the characters personalities with his questioning. The inspector leads the characters to confront their own weaknesses, which makes them feel shocked and guilty, getting them to put across there role in the story of the suicide of Eva Smith (Daisy Renton). He is the moral character in the play, in which the audience takes sides with. The physical characteristics of the Inspector as described by Priestley in his notes are that: "The Inspector needs not to be a big man. He is a man in his fifties, dressed plain darkish suit of the period." ...read more.

Middle

In addition, he uses a rhythm of the language, "All intertwined with our lives, with what we think and say and do" It is very serious and has commanding tone about it, which inspires us all to think and look at our lives. This is the determining factor, which tells us, that is this really a speech of a true police inspector? Or Alternatively, is this the ending morality to the play? All the character were firstly shocked by the impact of the speech. However, it is plain that Mr. Birling's motives are to protect himself from social scandal. To do this, he is prepared to he is prepared to distort or ignore the truth and treats this revelation as way to escape the truth of what has happened. He is blind to the hypocrisy, and indifferent when it is pointed out. Just before the end of the play he argues that 'the whole thing is different now', and congratulates himself on having avoided a scandal. Provided their public reputation is safe. Mr. Birling appears to be a hardheaded businessperson who is more concerned with high profits then the welfare of his employees. He thought very highly of himself as he might find his 'way into the next honours list' but regards with contempt the 'cranks' who say that "Everybody should look after everybody else". ...read more.

Conclusion

In the Inspectors last speech he says, "Fire blood and anguish" which I think is dramatic irony from Priestley's writing to add effect and add depth to his whole moral about how people's actions can have serve effects on someone else. The "fire and blood and anguish" is reference to the First and Second World Wars would be very influential to the audience seeming that the play takes place in 1912. The intended effect of the predictions was to make the audience see a glimpse of the kind of person the character is. In the case of Birling, the audience would see him as a character whose opinion is not to be trusted, whereas the predictions made by the Inspector chill the audience and make them see that the lesson he speaks of has been re-taught through fire and blood and anguish twice already. The audiences had experienced the horrors of war and were not eager to experience them again, so they may think that if they followed JB Priestley's message, they would prevent yet another world war. In my opinion the inspectors last speech is the best part in the play because not only do you here the Inspectors final reflection but you also understand Priestley's whole point in writing the play and it adds dramatic depth to the whole meaning of everything that incurs in the play. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE J.B. Priestley section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE J.B. Priestley essays

  1. Discussthe role of the Inspector in the play 'An Inspector Calls'

    Well, Mr Birling obviously finds the fact that they have been set up amusing, although this contradicts his point of view earlier on in the play. This shows how Birling is an inconsiderate, careless character. Sheila then pronounces passionately, that, "You're pretending everything's just as it was before," but Eric

  2. 'An Inspector calls' is set in 1912 and was written for a 1946 audience. ...

    For this reason it was very unpopular with these sorts of people, and appealed more to the younger generation, the likes of Eric and Sheila. After this play was shown, we have had two socialist governments and the NHS has been set up, telling us that this lesson has long been learnt.

  1. An Inspector Calls by J.B Priestley is a play about an inspector who tries ...

    'She wanted twenty-five shillings a week instead of twenty-two and six pence. You made her pay a heavy price for that. And now she'll make you pay a heavier price still.', this quote clearly shows that the inspector is talking about guilt and wants to persuade the characters in the

  2. An Inspector Calls. Explore how Priestley portrays Sheilas role in the play and ...

    After that, he went out for a walk. Then inspector turns towards Mrs Birling, she is linked to eva smith because she failed her "job" as a member of the Brumley Women's Charity Organization by not helping deserving cases. She refused Eva's ask for help she was pregnant and had

  1. Explain how Priestly manages to create a very vivid picture of the character of ...

    This isn't normally how a police officer would behave, he seems to be very sympathetic of Eva and critical of Mr Birling and he isn't afraid to express this. Mr Birling tries to intimidate him again, "Perhaps I ought to warn you that he's an old friend of mine, and that I see him fairly frequently.

  2. Write a letter from Priestley to a colleague explaining his reasons for, and his ...

    It is only at the end of the play, and after the inspector has left, that it is discovered that the inspector was a fraud. The play concludes with a dramatic telephone call in which the Birlings learn that an Inspector will arrive to investigate the suicide of a young woman.

  1. Discuss the impact of the inspector's final speech & exit and explore why it ...

    The Inspector is saying that although this one unfortunate member of society has died, there are a lot more out there by saying that 'there are millions and millions and millions of Eva Smiths and John Smiths'. A group of three is used here to emphasize the amount of unfortunate being still out there.

  2. How does Priestley make the Inspectors final speech so powerful?

    showing more respect in the future to the working class, and not to take advantage with the power that they may have over them. He reiterates this through the speech, reinforcing what he has just said to show again how important it is to work in unity with everyone else to succeed in life.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work