• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Analyse and evaluate Shakespeare(TM)s use of soliloquy in presenting the developing character of Hamlet.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Analyse and evaluate Shakespeare's use of soliloquy in presenting the developing character of Hamlet. "Hamlet" by William Shakespeare is a drama performed between 1599 and 1601. "Hamlet" is a fusion of many themes, which bond together to form a complex, ambiguous play. "Hamlet", simplified, is the story of a man brimming with vengeance, trying to avenge his father's death which was caused by his uncle, Claudius who then marries Hamlet's mother, Gertrude. The death of his father is a tragedy in itself. Perceptions of tragedies differ from individuals perspectives; anything can be a tragic as long as it takes the right composition or form. Calamitous situations weaved with anguish and despair in addition to the possibility of destruction and heartbreak are some of the most common elements employed by tragic writers. Dominant features of a tragedy also include the protagonist's downfall, usually a consequence of their hamartia. This is evident in "Hamlet". Hamlet, the protagonist encounters anagnorisis due to his hamartia, ultimately leading to death of most of the cast. The complexity of Hamlet's character is a mystery to the audience but through soliloquy's, William Shakespeare shows the audience Hamlet's feelings and thoughts and how they develop. ...read more.

Middle

He feels as though she is moving on too quickly. Hamlet seems to be trapped in the memory of his father, he doesn't seem to be completely grief ridden but it seems like he wants to reminisce his father's existence. He wants to be close to his mother too, and he feels like it's her duty to mourn. Going into another relationship so abruptly leaves Hamlet feeling as though she felt nothing towards her father. Hamlet believes all the tears she cried for him must therefore be fake. 'Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears/ Had left the flushing in her galled eyes' She doesn't deserve to mourn, in Hamlet's eyes. Hamlet at this point in the play is experiencing melancholia. He is grieving and is faced with more problems. This soliloquy helps us understand what Hamlet is feeling about the situation. Hamlet at this point is still an enigmatic character although he is showing his frustration quite clearly; he is yet to act upon his feelings and is trapped within his mind. Although he is feeling great annoyance towards the whole situation he hasn't confronted his mother about it yet. ...read more.

Conclusion

He thinks if he kills Claudius now, his crime will go unpunished. Hamlet wants to ensure Claudius gets what he deserves: damnation. He feels like it is his duty to fulfil this. 'Then trip him, that his heels may kick at heaven, / And that his soul may be as damn'd and black / As hell, whereto it goes.' He wants to make sure there is no way Claudius will go to heaven. 'O, this is hire and salary, not revenge.' This is not something Hamlet sees as revenge, but something he must do, something compulsory. These three soliloquies demonstrate Hamlet's character and it shows his character development also. They portray his indecisiveness; he doesn't know when to kill Claudius. As he leaves it to the very end to take action the play ends in tragedy, naturally. He becomes more and more aware of his "duty" and feels the need to have to take Claudius's life. Although Hamlet's character seems to feign insanity by the end of the play Hamlet's negative mind is definitely over powering him which leads to his mental breakdown. The soliloquies are successful in showing this as the audience get to see the slow progression of his insanity and how his character fully develops. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Hamlet section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Hamlet essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    What is the importance of the Soliloquies in Hamlet? Do they show any development ...

    4 star(s)

    I believe this would display just how shallow Hamlet thinks of himself. Hamlet presents himself emotionally using words that describe the player's acting that appeal to emotions, 'passion' and 'tears'. Hamlet feels insufficient and ashamed of his delay in avenging his father's murder and asks himself if he is feeble; 'Am I a coward?'.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    How do Hamlet's Soliloquies reveal his Changing thoughts and Moods throughout the play?

    4 star(s)

    Especially the way, even when u read them, they make u spit them out. It is though they are disgusting, poisoned, and almost shameful. These words are said as hamlet is questioning about how he does nothing to avenge his father.

  1. Mighty opposites; Hamlet and Claudius.

    This is how he second guess's God's actions. In the prayer scene we as audience are also given a chance to sympathise with Claudius (arguably the villain of the play). Almost all Hamlet's soliloquies make the reader feel pity and sympathy for him, as he is the victim of the

  2. How does Shakespeare portray changes in Hamlets character in soliloquy one and four

    Further proof of his disappointment is shown in the following eleven lines, which heavily shows his bitter disappointment and the disgrace his mother has caused. Hamlet tells us that his father was dead for "two months" but then later tells us that he was dead for less than two months before Gertrude re-marries.

  1. Sigmund Freud, father of psychoanalysis, used Shakespeare's character, Hamlet, in a letter written to ...

    It is interesting to note the depiction of Claudius' eyes as beady and at times "clenched", symbolically hindering the viewer from viewing the true contents of his soul, in comparison to the troubled, searching eyes of "mindly Hamlet", as compared to the reasonably static, unemotive eyes of "bodily Hamlet".

  2. Select two soliloquies from Hamlet and analyse their significance to the play as a ...

    The ghost says nothing to the guards, or Horatio "Stay! Speak, speak, I charge thee to speak!" Horatio decides to tell Hamlet about the ghost as he believes that "This spirit, dumb to us, will speak to him." The characters, Cladius (King of Denmark), Gertrude (Queen), Hamlet (Prince of Denmark),

  1. How Does Shakespeare Convey a Sense of Anomie in Hamlet Act 1, and to ...

    That fact, accompanied by the omen of war represented by the ghost, introduces political, or social anomie, as the state of Denmark looks set for war. Another way the the ghost could create anomie in Act 1 is the fact that in the time the play was written, a spirit

  2. By close examination of three soliloquies, discuss Hamlet's changing state of mind

    she follow'd my poor father's body, Like Niobe, all tears: - why she, even she -'. In this broken sentence, there are four caesuras in as many lines. This emphasises Hamlet's heightened emotions, as he cannot control everything he is feeling; many of his thoughts on the matter run into

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work