• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Analyse the dramatic importance of Act 1 Scene 5 in 'Romeo and Juliet'

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Analyse the dramatic importance of Act 1 Scene 5 in 'Romeo and Juliet' In 'Romeo and Juliet' the main rivals, the montegues and capulets fight as their children (Romeo and Juliet) fall in love. After a series of unfortunate events both children end up dead. When Shakespeare wrote this play in the C16 the woman's place in the home was that of purely homemaker and child bearer, consequently the role of women in Shakespearean theatre was almost unheard of. Young men were used to play the parts of women. Most plays consisted of some kind of tragedy as this kept the audiences intrigued and they would come again. This might suggest that the money was important to pay the actors. Shakespeare starts the play by introducing the audience to Romeo giving the audience to gather their opinion of a dreamy lovesick young boy - he talks about Rosaline and a dream he has had (1.4.). ...read more.

Middle

the hall ready for the party, the feeling of urgency might suggest that this party is important to Lord Capulet and he does not want to displease him. The scene beginning with such movement and concerned agitation grabs the viewer's attention and are drawn into the play at once, wondering why it is essential to clear the hall so fast. Lord Capulet enters in a good mood he greets his guest upon entering the ball. He is urging them to dance and have a good time as shown in the line -welcome gentleman. Ladies that have their toes unplagued with corns will walk a bout with you - his good humour has been generated by the engagement of his daughter to the princes' nephew, Paris. Although there is a moment of brief anger at line 62 started by Tybalt who recognised Romeo's voice, his mood changes throughout the play whenever he feels stressed by his relations. ...read more.

Conclusion

In order to understand the intensity of Tybalt, we need to see the older, calmer, tired of feuding, Lord Capulet. Romeo speaks of Juliet in a soliloquy as a contrast and light that brightens up the darkest of rooms. His first reactions towards Juliet are loving and amazed as though he has never seen anything so wonderful and beautiful in his life, which is shown in the way he comment on these things '...Rich jewel in eithops ear' She stands out brightly among darker things. When Romeo first sees Juliet "What ladies that which doth enrich the hand of yonder night?" "'O she doth teach the torches to burn bright" referring to the fact that she lights up the room. When referring to Rosaline Romeo uses oxymoron's "she shall not be hit with cupids arrow" - showing he is confused and unhappy, accusing Rosaline of a cold heart (unrequited love) for his unhappiness. This is not true love. There are no contradictions in his first seeing Juliet. When Romeo first sees Juliet he presents himself as unworthy " If I profane with my unworthiest hand" (1.5.93). ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Romeo and Juliet section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work