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At the end of the play Alfieri says of Eddie that despite 'how wrong he was... I think I will love him more than any of my sensible clients.' To what extent does Arthur Miller make you agree with Alfieri?

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Introduction

Coursework Piece on "A View from the Bridge" At the end of the play Alfieri says of Eddie that despite 'how wrong he was... I think I will love him more than any of my sensible clients.' To what extent does Arthur Miller make you agree with Alfieri? I feel that Miller creates a strong, wise, conclusive figure through Alfieri, as he acts as an over-looker at both the beginning and end of the play. In the ancient plays, an essential part was that of the chorus: a group of figures who would watch the action, comment on it, and address the audience directly. In A View from the Bridge, Alfieri is the equivalent of the chorus. He introduces the action as a retelling of events already in the past. By giving details of place, date or time, he enables the action to move swiftly from one episode to another, without the characters having to give this information. This is often skillfully mixed with brief comment: "He was as good a man as he had to be...he brought home his pay, and he lived. And toward ten o'clock of that night, after they had eaten, the cousins came". Because much of this is fact, we believe the part, which is opinion. ...read more.

Middle

Alfieri's view is also the "view from the bridge" of the title. To those around Eddie, those "on the water front", the events depicted are immediate, passionate and confused. But the audience has an ambiguous view. In the extended episodes of action we may forget as Marco lifts the chair, or as Eddie kisses Rodolpho, that Alfieri is narrating. What we see is theatrical and exciting; we are involved as spectators. But at the end of the episode, as the light goes up on Alfieri, we are challenged to make a judgement. If Eddie, as we see him, appeals to our hearts, Alfieri makes sure we also judge with our heads. Hence, I feel that Miller, through Alfieri, voices his own opinion, and thus in his tragedy delivers to the audience his hero - Eddie Carbone. We also trust a lawyer to be a good judge of character and rational, because he is professionally detached. Alfieri is not quite detached; his is connection with Eddie is faint: "I had represented his father in an accident case some years before, and I was acquainted with the family in a casual way". But in the next interlude, Alfieri tells us how he is so disturbed, that he consults a wise old woman, who tells him to pray for Eddie. ...read more.

Conclusion

Most of us, says Alfieri, being more educated, more sophisticated, more in control, can either hide our feelings or, better, overcome them. Stage directions refer not to exits and entrances but to the light going down or coming up on Alfieri at his desk. This is further enforced as we switch from the extended bouts of action to the interludes, which allow him to comment, to move forward in time and give brief indications of circumstantial detail such as the source of the whisky Eddie brings home at the start of Act Two. Alfieri's view is also the "view from the bridge" of the title. To those around Eddie, those "on the water front", the events depicted are immediate, passionate and confused. But the audience has an ambiguous view. In the extended episodes of action we may forget, as Marco lifts the chair, or as Eddie kisses Rodolpho, that Alfieri is narrating. What we see is theatrical and exciting; we are involved as spectators. But at the end of the episode, as the light goes up on Alfieri, we are challenged to make a judgement. If Eddie, as we see him, appeals to our hearts, Alfieri makes sure we also judge with our heads. Hence in conclusion, I feel that Miller, through Alfieri, voices his own opinion, and thus in his tragedy delivers to the audience his hero - Eddie Carbone. Joanna Malek Yr !0f ...read more.

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