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Cannabis_Life Wrecker or Pain Rliever?

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Introduction

Cannabis - life wrecker or pain reliever? The aim of this essay is to, by reference to many sources, give an unbiased comparison between the campaigns for legalisation of cannabis and those who want it to remain an illegal drug or in fact be reclassified by the government to a higher level. Cannabis is the most widely used illegal drug in Britain and is available in several forms the most commonly used and available being resin. Other available forms are the natural leaves or 'skunk', the dried leaves of cannabis crumbled. There are many commonly used names for cannabis including draw, hash, blow and the more frequently used 'street name' weed. Within the main stream of society cannabis is considered by many as a socially acceptable drug and not considered as harmful as other drugs. However there can be serious penalties for possession of cannabis ranging from the minimum of "a slap on the wrist" and a confiscation of the drug to the far more serious consequence, a maximum two year prison sentence combined with an unlimited fine. ...read more.

Middle

It is possible babies may be lower in birth weight and have developmental problems. In contrast cannabis can actually be prescribed in extreme cases by your GP for its pain relieving properties. Many people see these benefits out way the negatives associated with the drug including doctors. A recent survey reveals that 90% of doctors in California secretly advise patients with illnesses such as glaucoma and asthma to smoke cannabis to relieve the symptoms. It is their belief that cannabis is two to three times more effective than any legal drug with less toxic side affects. The government of Great Britain reclassified cannabis from a Class B to Class C drug on 29th January 2004. Reclassification means that they are acknowledging the fact that cannabis is not as harmful as other Class B drugs. People are constantly campaigning for the legalisation of cannabis and this motion by the government is an indication that not only medical advice is taken notice into consideration but also that of public opinion. Modern society is such a pressurised way of life that some people find more ways to relax and chill out so the instead of turning to alcohol they turn to less addictive and in some ways less harmful cannabis. ...read more.

Conclusion

On the other hand it can be argued that cannabis is less addictive than tobacco or alcohol and it also does less harm to the body. A government report found that high use of cannabis isn't associated with major health problems or sociological problems, unlike other harder drugs. Some reports claim that cannabis has an effect on the heart similar to those of exercise, so it may be just as good for you as going to the gym. In conclusion, after studying many sources of information arguing for and against the legalisation of cannabis, I feel that cannabis should remain an illegal drug as it affects the mind and body in quite serious ways even if it is only used in moderation. The facts and figures prove that the use of cannabis can increase the risk of occurrence of certain illnesses such as lung cancer and schizophrenia. Also there is the cost issue of smoking cannabis, depending on the amount used cannabis can cost a lot of money and for those prone to an addictive nature can get them into financial trouble such as debts with a dealer. The more you use the more you need to get the same and desired effect. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 Nick Black ...read more.

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