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Chapter 11 sees Pip on his second visit to Satis House, and the early introduction of several important characters such as Jaggers and Herbert, who play vital roles in Pip's later life and 'great expectations'.

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Introduction

LOOK AGAIN OVER CHAPTER 11, AND WRITE A DETAILED COMMENTARY ON THIS CHAPTER, FOCUSING PARTICULARLY ON CHARACTER AND FUTURE PLOTS Chapter 11 sees Pip on his second visit to Satis House, and the early introduction of several important characters such as Jaggers and Herbert, who play vital roles in Pip's later life and 'great expectations'. Ms. Havisham's poisoned and hateful mind can be seen through her malicious thoughts that are reflected through her choice of words: 'I am yellow skin and bone'. She has clearly brooded a great deal over her past and has lived the majority of her adult life full of contempt and bitterness for the entire male race. An air of Mystery is given to the fact that we do not actually know the cause of Ms. Havisham'' resentment, all we do know is that she was once to be married, and due to some occurrence or misfortune, the wedding did not take, but everything, from that fateful day, has stayed still. ...read more.

Middle

The dull nonsensical conversations made by the relatives emphasise just how intriguing Ms. Havisham's character is. Her dramatic flairs of speech and over-exaggeration: 'when they lay me dead' captures the readers much more than the repetitive, irrelevant conversation made by the relatives. Ms. Havisham's relations are characterised as being money-greedy, selfish people. Their only reasons for visiting their half-sister is simply for her large fortune and in the hope that they, once she is finally dead, will inherit each large portions of her money. The dreary, dull conversations that seem to have no concluding points underlines the uselessness and narrow-mindedness of these people. Certainly, the descriptions of the relatives are far from flattering: '...so very blank and high was the dead wall of her face'. Dicken's has chosen to make these characters into comic figures. They represent Dicken's view of the majority of middle-high class of society, educated yet still fools. ...read more.

Conclusion

Herbert, 'the Pale young gentleman' is first introduced in this chapter, as an unhealthy boy, with 'pimple on his face' and a 'breaking out at his mouth', yet, his brave attitude and desperation to fight a fair and just battle appeals to the readers. As he says to Pip after he has been so easily defeated: 'That means you have won'. Even Pip is surprised by his moral integrity: 'He was so brave and innocent', his ability to accept defeat and fight an unlikely battle gains respect from the readers, and Herbert is seen as a comical figure at his vain attempts fight back at Pip. He later carries the image of honesty when he is an adult, and represents the gentleman whose of free-spirit, whose cares lie not in money and reputation, but in the happiness of life. In Chapter 11, we are introduced to several new characters and are given distinct and sometimes obvious clues to Pip's later life. They later play a great influence on Pip's thoughts, actions, and journey to become a true gentleman. ...read more.

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