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Charles Dickens, Great Expectations.

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Introduction

Charles Dickens, Great Expectations. At the time of the 1800s Dickens wrote novels based on society. His intentions and concerns were in regards to the justice and punishment system in Britain, he was determined to tear the gap between the rich and the poor which were the two nations living in Britain at the time. Dickens own experience of poverty clearly shaped his views. Dickens was very interested in bringing about change in his novels; he dealt with topics such as the justice and punishment (e.g. Great Expectations). Dickens wanted us to question the justice and punishment system in Britain at the time. Through his novels he criticized the system and during his social lifetime he investigated the social change. He felt criminals were treated unjustly. The setting of the play is extremely significant to the novel as Dickens based it on where he lived, Gods Hill. ...read more.

Middle

In chapter 1 the narrator introduces the character by confronting him in a graveyard. He is a strong, bold man who confronts Pip trying to scare the wits out of him. "Tell us your name...quick." The convict uses forceful language. This makes him come across as a nasty piece of work that pip has to give in to. When we meet the characters again in chapter 39, we see they have got older and wiser. Pip is now described as a 23 year old educated man living in a temple. When he has his second encounter with the convict we see that he is not as scared as he was in the first chapter. "What floor do you want?" When he speaks to the convict for a second time we see that his tone is a lot more typical in chapter one he was very scared and stuttered everything he said but in this chapter he is older and he knows that a 60 year old man cannot harm him. ...read more.

Conclusion

In chapter 39 we see that Pip has grown up his is a young educated man who is disputed and anxious. He is still lonely When we meet the convict again he has long iron-grey hair he is more muscular and has had a lot of exposure t the weather. He is wearing a hat, he has now got wrinkles and a course broken voice. In chapter 1 in the nineteenth century we learnt that most of the population lived in the country side most people wanted long hours in factories and lived in Squalor. As the novel continues we learn in chapter 39 that industrial revolution led to rapid growth of cities. People moved to acquire better jobs. Increase in development of transport. Young men like Pip aspired to greater things and people now wanted an education. Charles Dickens's message was he wanted us to question the justice and punishment system in Britain at the time. Through his novels he criticized the system and during his lifetime he investigated the social change. He felt criminals were felt unjustly. ...read more.

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