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Choose one scene or part of a scene and analyse significance, historical context and dramatic quality referring to the language Shakespeare uses Act 3 Scene 1- The climax of the play.

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Introduction

English Coursework Choose one scene or part of a scene and analyse significance, historical context and dramatic quality referring to the language Shakespeare uses Act 3 Scene 1 - The climax of the play Italians normally take a nap after lunch during the heat of the day. In the height of summer the heat is supposed to create madness. Shakespeare may have moved the action from spring to summer for just this reason. There are many themes in this play especially in this scene * Hastiness- Romeo is hasty to fall in and out of love. The two are too hasty to get married; they never thought about what could go wrong. * Infatuation- Romeo and Juliet, in all probability, were not really in love. They were infatuated with each other. They were in love with the idea that they were in love. They could not have fallen so deeply in love with only one conversation. * Selfishness- Tybalt was selfish for killing Mercutio. Romeo was not thinking of Juliet as he killed her cousin. Mercutio and Benvolio are in the public square of the city. Benvolio suggests that they go home since the Capulets are likely to encounter them (and if we meet we shall not scape a brawl). Mercutio is always ready for a fight, Responds with his good-natures humour and accuses Benvolio of being too peace loving. ...read more.

Middle

This demonstrates how Mercutio is a strong representation of all that is youthful and carefree in this play. Mercutio does not change dramatically in this play. The only slight change a reader may see is when he is about to die, he yells: "A plague on both your houses!" This may be regarded as a change because Mercutio has never been so serious before. He has never expressed any disagreement of the relationship between the Montagues and the Capulets. Now, he seems to realize the damage the fighting is capable of doing, unfortunately, it was too late for him. In conclusion, Mercutio's character is obviously very complex and vital to the plot of this play. He represents independence, youth, and freedom, and makes the story line a lot more interesting. He is apparently a vital role to this play and its success. This scene is characterized by rapidity of action and varied moods. It marks the crisis of the play with the deaths of Mercutio and Tybalt and the banishment of Romeo. This is also important because of the irony, as Romeo's flaws are that he is impulsive and immature, but when he does act mature as well as refusing to fight it ends up in disaster so, although Romeo has married Juliet, he is now unable to stay with her in Verona. ...read more.

Conclusion

Before the death of Mercutio Romeo does not want to duel with Tybalt and so he says "I do protest I never injur'd thee, but love thee better than thou canst devise, till thou shalt know the reason of my love: and so, good Capulet, which name I tender, as dearly as my own, be satisfied," this shows that Romeo does not want to hurt Tybalt as he is now Romeo's relation, but after Mercutio died Romeo says "this day's black fate on mo days doth depend; This but begins the woe others must end," and to Tybalt he says that either him or Tybalt or both must go with Mercutio's soul. The language that Romeo uses before and after the death of Mercutio is contradictory to what he said before the death. The imagery before the death of Mercutio is cheerful and witty but after he passed away the imagery is all gloomy and dark. There are some key issues intwined in this scene and the rest of the play * Feuding- The feuding of the families was the whole reason for the tragedy. They should have reconciled their differences years ago. They didn't even know what they were fighting about. * Fate- It was considered fate that they would meet and fall in love and then die for each other. Fate brought them together as well as ended their lives. It was in the stars. Joseph Motha ...read more.

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