• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Choose three characters from different stories. Compare their experiences.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Coursework on Stories of the Supernatural Choose three characters from different stories. Compare their experiences. How do the authors make these experiences seem strange and frightening to the reader? The three characters I have chosen are the Narrator from Charles Dickens' "Confessions Found in a Prison, Isaac Scatchard from Wilkie Collins' "The Ostler" and the Narrator from H.G. Wells' "The Red Room". In C.F.I.P (Confessions Found in a Prison) the narrator seems quite a normal man, but is driven to the murder of his nephew by the "evil eye". He first encounters this experience from his brother's wife, and then discovers it in their son (the boy he murders). Which influences him to kill the boy but his guilt leads to the discovery of the murder and thus the end of his life. In The Ostler, Isaac Scatchard is a man tormented by his wife. When he first meets her in the form of what appears to be a very realistic dream. He later meets her again and falls in love with this woman, who is called Rebecca Murdoch, but after their marriage their love begins to deteriorate, and Isaac realises that his wife is not quite normal and she has taken to drinking. Their marriage leads to Isaac's life being destroyed and she torments him even though she has gone. In R.R. (Red Room) the narrator is a rather arrogant young man who spends a night in Lorraine castle, in a "haunted" room. ...read more.

Middle

It is really his fear that caused him not to be able to hide the body. But even though the man has done a terrible thing, we do feel some sympathy for him, and this is emphasised in the closing statement "I am alone in this stone dungeon with my evil spirit, and that I die tomorrow. This makes us feel for the man, as he does seem to show some remorse, though he does not make excuses for his actions. Tension is also added as the story is told in the first person, because it feels as though we are being brought closer to the reader, that he is personally telling the story to us and that we are in direct relation to him. Tension is created in various ways in Wilkie Collins' The Ostler. The first way is how location is used. Before Isaac has the dream of his attempted murder, the environment is set by describing "the surging moan of wind". This adds tension as it gives it a scary factor, and leads us to expect some sort of action. This happens at 2 o' clock in the morning which causes the reader to feel discomforted. It gives the feel that when it is dark we become very helpless, and this makes it seem more frightening, foreboding, and it makes both the reader and Isaac feel threatened. Tension is added in other ways in The Ostler. At the beginning of the story we find a man with a "withered woebegone face", tension is creates here because we wonder who is this man and what is he doing here. ...read more.

Conclusion

We are then taken into the "Red Room". Tension is evident here by the man's poise gradually weakening. This can be shown in the candle and how it repeatedly goes out, the man tries to stay calm but you can tell he cannot tolerate it and is terrified by the darkness. The reader also feels some satisfaction because you feel the man had it coming and that he deserves it after being so arrogant and big-headed. In the end, the man who is now in a position a terrible fear and fright tells us that there are no ghosts, but it is fear itself that drove him into a mad fit. This makes the situation even more frightening and leads the reader to believe that if they are so afraid of something they could end up in a similar condition. These stories were written in Victorian times and were very successful when published, because people were fascinated by supernatural stories. This may have been due to the fact that they were "Run of the mill" people. Or some people felt they could relate well to the stories. They would not have had TVs and so this would have been their entertainment. During these times people relished stories of the unknown and supernatural, and the authors obliged and given them what they wanted. But today, these stories would not be so popular due to the high demand for quality TV, and the decline in book reading. Therefore the imagination of today's society has been weakened. It is a pity that society doesn't appreciate quality literature now. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE H.G. Wells section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE H.G. Wells essays

  1. PRE-1914 PROSE

    However, today we have more technology and scientific explanations of such events that may lead us into not believing in the strange and supernatural unlike in the past. People were also afraid of these things because of its strangeness and incongruity, which means these stories were associated with the reader's own experiences as well.

  2. Compare The Ostler and The Darkness Out There

    wrong have changed, and most people do not have such a strong sense of duty. Although the character of a manipulative woman still appears in many stories, some aspects of Rebecca's background would not appear in a 20th century story.

  1. What expectations do the authors create by the way they begin their stories? - ...

    This part of the story is set in a stable, where the ostler sleeps and has his strange dream, and then outside of a house where the landlord approaches the narrator and explains his dream. This is the only vague expectation Collins leaves the reader that the next part of

  2. The Whole Towns Sleeping,” by Ray Bradbury and “A Terribly Strange Bed,” by Wilkie ...

    The tension is eased however when Lavinia says to Francine, "Those women like to see their tongues dance." Francine isn't so sure and suggests to Lavinia, "Maybe we shouldn't go to the movie... the Lonely One might follow us and kill.

  1. Compare and contrast - 'The red room' by HG Wells, 'The Black Cottage' By ...

    This may be because they are too scared to go anywhere near the room themselves, because know what is there. This also gives HG Wells the opportunity to develop the journey to the Red Room, and he can go on describing other happenings along the way.

  2. Gothic stories -

    Another technique that the author uses is repetition. He says the quote, "(this night of all nights)" which on its own builds tension, but the author repeats it to emphasise that it is important. The author's aims by doing this was to emphasise how important the sentence was and to predict the future.

  1. World War 1 - The poem I found most amusing from the 'That Old ...

    One room is haunted but the other is not. In both stories the room plays quite a role. The history of the rooms in the both stories is also important. The author of 'Farthing House' takes a modern approach and the author of the 'The Red Room', H G Wells, takes a ghostly type approach to the The story

  2. Mrs Turner Cutting The Grass & The Purple Pileus Comparison - Both Stories Concentrate ...

    I believe this is what Shields is trying to express by using this type of subtle, controlled language, where she does not insult Mrs Turner, nor does she give her opinion (her judgement) of the character. She merely sets up an image of an innocuous old lady that's just going

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work