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Commentary on 'The Explorer's Daughter

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In what ways is the writer able to convey the contradictory feelings and emotions she experiences in relation to the hunting of the narwhal? On one hand the writer describes the scene she sees in front of her a 'glittering kingdom' with evening light 'turning butter-gold, glinting off man and whale' suggesing an intense and exciting moment, yet, she 'urged the narwhal to dive, to leave, to survive' while the hunter was trying to hunt for the whale. Notice the use of triplets 'to dive, to leave, to survive' indicates the immense struggle within the writer's heart. Compared to her family and other local Inuits she is certainly sentimental with mixed, contradictory emotions. ...read more.


Her statements once again bear characteristics of her confound thoughts, suggesting her capricious emotion towards the situation. In the fifth paragraph, not only did the narrator manages to demonstrate penchant and venerability towards the hunters, but depicts the intense and heartening scene as 'a vast, waterborne game with the hunters spread like a net around the sound.' Smiley is used here to emphasis her concern as well as excitement on the situation in which she experiences. Moreover, there's a repetition of 'so' when the hunter is portrayed to be 'so close, and so brave'. It stresses the writer's support of the man until she diverted to the other side, 'at the same time my heart also urged the narwhal to dive, to leave, to survive' she couldn't ...read more.


It's certain the writer hopes to parry it when it comes to the moment - a decision to be made. 'A dilemma', as written, is what she considered of, and it is just and unjust, yes or no in her point of view. In fact, it stayed with her the whole time she was in Greenland. The final paragraph somehow manages to redeem the narwhals and pities the hunting of them, but actually it's a justification for the local hunters, arguing the necessity of hunting in Greenland. Yet the writer attempts to exemplify the moral drawbacks of hunting narwhals and her own ambivalent emotions to set off the importance of hunting despite all the tough morals. The writer not only used effective writing devices to illustrate her ambivalent feelings but exemplified evidences and facts to strengthen it. ?? ?? ?? ?? Jason Lin 11T ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

2 stars **
The writer makes some perceptive comments and analyses language accurately.
Lapses in expression and ill chosen words make the meaning unclear in some places.
More quotes need to be included in the final paragraph to support statements.

Marked by teacher Katie Dixon 10/05/2013

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