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COMPARE AND CONTRAST THE DEPICTION OF CELIE'S STRUGGLE IN STEVEN SPIELBURG'S FILM VERSION OF 'THE COLOR PURPLE' AND THE NOVEL

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Introduction

COMPARE AND CONTRAST THE DEPICTION OF CELIE'S STRUGGLE IN STEVEN SPIELBURG'S FILM VERSION OF 'THE COLOR PURPLE' AND THE NOVEL Innocence and naivety is portrayed instantly as the initial theme for "The Color Purple", in both respects. Spielburg opens with the positive scene of the heroine, Celie, playing wistfully in the fields with her sister, Nettie. Similarly, the novel commences with the words, "I am fourteen years old. I have always been a good girl". In both cases, the brief curiosity of youth is quickly driven out, as the reader and the audience are forced to realise the fate of this adolescent girl. ...read more.

Middle

The reader also learns much more of the young girl's naivety, influenced by explicit vocabulary of her developing pregnancy, and afterbirth with such statements like, "I got breasts full of milk running down myself". Such detailed references were not supported in the film production of "The Color Purple". Celie talks of her condition in a way by which the reader knows it is all first-hand experience, showing again her age and ingenuousness. Spielburg introduces the necessity and warmth of Celie's relationship with her sister, Nettie in the opening scene, as the pair play carelessly in the sun. This initial showing of the sister's closeness differs entirely from the novel's interpretation. ...read more.

Conclusion

It is apparent that the author and director of "The Color Purple" have chosen to capture their audience in different respects; Spielburg later focusing on a life revolving around Shug Avery (the outrageous character who loves to continuously sing), and all that she resembles, as opposed to Celie's struggle to hold onto the love of her sister and her children, and her developing sexual curiosity involving Shug Avery. Walker talks of the months of which Albert takes to consider the prospect of Celie as his wife, whereas the conjunction is instantaneous in the eyes of Spielburg, and the couple marry early on. Celie then becomes Albert's virtual slave, in all respects, with both Walker and Spielburg depicting awful domestic violence from the dominant male. Francesca Selway 1 ...read more.

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