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Compare and contrast the education and upbringing of all the children in “Great Expectations” by Charles Dickens and “To Kill A Mockingbird” by Harper Lee.

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Introduction

GCSE English and Literature Coursework Task: Compare and contrast the education and upbringing of all the children in "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens and "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee. Consider carefully the moral and social issues of the time, concerning the education and upbringing of the children, brought to light by each writer. I am going to compare two novels called "Great Expectations" and "To Kill A Mockingbird". Great Expectations was a best seller in its time and is one of the novels that Charles Dickens is most famous for. It is said that Great Expectations reflected on parts of his childhood but was denied as being autobiographical. At the age of twelve, Dickens had to leave his school because his father was sent to jail. He was made to work in a factory for a year. I feel that he has portrayed inept parents, prisons and ill-treated children into his novel. Even though Harper lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird" is set at a completely different time to "Great Expectations", it is still the same genre, which is Buildingsroman. Buildingsroman is a novel that describes a characters childhood through to adulthood. Both books were written as if a person was looking back on their childhood. ...read more.

Middle

This means she uses force and violence to keep him under control. Mrs. Joe Gargery also has "Tickler", which is a piece of cane that she uses to keep Pip in line. Dickens portrays Joe Gargery as a caring and loving parent, whereas he's showing Mrs. Joe Gargery as a typical bad parent who is only bringing Pip up because it's her duty to do so. Joe Gargery and Atticus are both portrayed as the loving parents/guardians who try to do their best for their children. Estella is also an orphan like Pip but has been adopted by Miss Havisham. Estella is thought of as "proud and pretty" and does everything she can to make Pip feel lower than herself. Miss Havisham is a very rich woman, so when she requests for Pip to be Estella's "playmate", Mrs. Joe Gargery is only too pleased to send him because she feels that she is able to gain something from this visit. Because of the way Estella has been brought up she takes an instant dislike to Pip. She feels that she should not have to associate with someone of Pips upbringing. She feels that he is not worthy of her because he is not of her class. ...read more.

Conclusion

The most obvious difference between "Great Expectations" and "To Kill A Mockingbird" is the class and wealth divide. In "To Kill A Mockingbird" the Finch family are white but poor. They are well respected and Scout and Jem have no problems at school because of how rich they are. The divide is between white people and black people. The blacks are seen as inferior and are segregated by the community. In "Great Expectations" the divide is between the rich and the poor, which is made obvious by Estella's dislike to Pip. Pip and his family are a poor working class family and Estella is rich so doesn't like associating with Pip. I conclude that both "Great Expectations" and "To Kill A Mockingbird" approach childhood and upbringing in a similar way. Both of the authors have string views of the social and moral issues happening at the time. Both novels are unified by the themes of childhood and growing up. It is clear that in "Great Expectations" and "To Kill A Mocking Bird" Even though there are many similarities there are also some evident differences. The main idea that we should get out of reading both of these novels is to respect people for them and not for what they own or how they look. What matters is what's on the inside, not what's on the outside. ...read more.

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