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Comparing and Contrasting ‘The man with the twisted lip’ with ‘Front’

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Introduction

Comparing and Contrasting 'The man with the twisted lip' with 'Front' There are many similarities and differences in both 'Front' and 'Twisted lip', but the most apparent relation between the two stories is the keeping up appearances (or keeping down appearances in the case of 'Twisted lip') theme, meaning they are about someone or something trying to conceal the truth or simply the truth isn't so obvious in the case of 'Front', the other less prevailing similarities/differences will be analysed later on in the essay. The beginning of both stories differ quite strongly, 'Front' begins with a narrator describing her experiences of seeing something that she would compare to as 'one of the seven wonders of the world' and there some definite references to class 'Five streets down' the comma after the word 'down' brings emphasis towards it and sets the impression that the narrator feels (or later on in the story, felt) that she is in a sense not worthy, or in awe with her surroundings, as the story shows that she is quite concerned about class, and the economic standings of her and her family as this will be pointed out later on in the essay, and becomes quite obvious when reading the story. The Writer also gives the reader the impression that this girl thinks very highly of this place, and although she imagines it to be 'so far above the town' she feels she is not good enough, 'I wanted to be forced to leave', ...read more.

Middle

This just shows how strong the class barriers still where at that time compared to the time 'Twisted Lip' was set in, even though they go to the same schools, a lot of people still categorized others in the way of the early 1900's. The writer quite cleverly makes out Patricia to be pretending she is something she is not, and later on, proving it. When both narrator and Patricia are on the street corner and she asks 'are you expected?' This type of expression is more commonly found in the conversing of the higher class, which the reader may have recently learned that she is not. So doing justice to the irony of the title, Patricia is putting on a 'Front' or putting it more frankly, pretending to be something she is not, but another aspect is that Patricia may used to have been financially secure but perhaps her family struck financial hardship. This point does raise questions later in the story to her motivation to want to bring the narrator to her home at the crescent, as this would simply show all to well how badly she lives. After the narrator had agreed to go to 'Pat's house (or slum) the writer show her mothers reaction towards this, and makes it fairly clear that the narrator is less snobbish herself and more worried about what her mother will think. ...read more.

Conclusion

said redundantly,' this shows again that the writer of 'Front' is trying to show the reader that Pat is quite depressed about how she lives. The writer uses little comments almost like sarcastic jokes about the size and state of Pat's living area. 'Then I realized, the kitchen cabinet was the kitchen' short but frank sentences like these seem funny at first, but then its realized that it wasn't an overstatement and that it simply the way it is. The writer also shows how the narrator is almost afraid to look around, as she doesn't want to drown the thoughts she used to have of the crescent in what she had and will see. The last part of the story is shows how pats mum feels which can really put the readers life in perspective. The words the writer used are effective, for example after pat lit the fire it becomes obvious that she wasn't allowed to as to her mum's reaction when the narrator leaves the room 'Oh Christ, that's the last of the coal.' Another hint towards the fact that they didn't normally live like that is when Pats mum says 'But to bring anyone to this place...' this obviously shows that even they don't like to live there means they've lived in places better. Another similarity comes out here, as there are a lot of references to where people live in 'Twisted Lip' and 'Front's' climax or pinnacle of the story is about Pat's house or 'slum'. ...read more.

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