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Comparing the way the children think in Great Expectations And Cider With Rosie

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Introduction

Comparing the way the children think in Great Expectations And Cider With Rosie Children are portrayed in many different ways in Great Expectations and Cider with Rosie. At the start of Great Expectations, the main character Pip is relatively childish he largely uses colour and shape to describe thing. For instance early on in chapter 1: " The shape of the letters on my fathers grave gave me an odd idea that he was a square, stout, dark man, with curly black hair." Pip uses the shape of letter and the colour of the gravestone to decide what his parents look like which is childish. Another quote that shows Pips childishness with his extremely lively imagination is later on in chapter 3: ". I had seen the damp lying on the outside of my little window as if some goblin had been crying there all night." Both of these quotes show how Pip is a child as he sees things as if they are goblins which children are scared of . ...read more.

Middle

He also worked extremely hard in the blacking factory. He also disliked his mother as he was told to go work in the blacking factory again after he left it by his mum. Miss Haversham and Mrs Joe reflect this in great expectations. Dickens wanted other people to understand the hardship that he had been through and was quite self-obsessed with his harsh childhood. He decided to tell people about this through the novels that he wrote and in the example In Great Expectations, Pip goes through many of the hardships that Dickens went through. Pip also has very deep feelings on people and things. Whereas Laurie Lee is more detached from his own thoughts he doesn't have guilt he is more interested in the world around him. Another difference in the way that the authors portray childhood is that Laurie Lee makes his childhood a beautiful childhood he paints a picture of the countryside and the things around him as shown on page }{}}{. Whereas Pip's is more dark and gloomy he shows the harder side of life as on page {}{}{}{}. ...read more.

Conclusion

As this line on page shows: "And exhaled our last guiltless days." However Laurie is not always guiltless, like pip he has a moment in the book where he felt guilty about what he had done. This is shown on page. 47 in the line: "That the summons to the big room, the policeman's hand on shoulder, comes almost always as a complete surprise, and for the crime that one has forgotten." Laurie lee and pip both see their elders in different ways. Pip sees their facial features and the way their features are shape as shown in this text on page}{}}{}}}}}}}}}{}{}. Laurie Lee relates possessions and smell with elders. As show on page][][][]][][]]]][. Pip sees everything much darker and sees the worst side of life there is no nice side of life for him he sees most things in a very dark nature. Laurie Lee sees thinks in a much happier view he thinks there is no bad side to life at a young age he is happy. This is probably because of the times that they grew up in and their surrounding. Rob Kemp ...read more.

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