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Connections between Boo and Tom in to Kill a Mockingbird.

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Introduction

Connections between Boo and Tom in to Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee seems to be telling toe different stories, that of Boo and Tom. Are there any connections between the storied? Although the novel seems to be telling two different stories, that of Tom Robinson and Boo Radley there are some connections between the stories. The first connection I'd like to highlight is that both Tom and Boo are Mockingbird figures. We know that Atticus and also Miss Maudie tell the children, and I quote, " Mockingbirds don't do one thing but make music for us to enjoy... they don't do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That is why it is a sin to kill a mockingbird." We see how Boo is portrayed as a mockingbird figure when he is locked away from any sort of normal life and society. That in turn, ruins any hope he has of a normal life. However, Boo stays out of sight for many years and his only communication with anyone other than his family for many years when he leave gifts for Jem and Scout in the tree outside his house. ...read more.

Middle

We know that Tom Robinson was found guilty to the charge of Rape to Mayella Ewell. This happened even though there was no evidence whatsoever to say that Tom did it, and plenty to say that he was in fact totally innocent. Also Tom in the trial shows how caring and honest he is when he says, " I felt right sorry for her." This was a huge mistake by Tom as a black man feeling sorry for a white woman was almost mocking in those days. But this also shows the caring side of Tom, he did honestly feel sorry for Mayella who was so lonely and desperate for attention she kissed a black man that was unspeakably not heard of in Maycomb Town. But however innocent Tom was he was never going to be found not guilty because of his color. This shows that like Boo Tom has done nothing wrong except help a girl with heavy jobs her father left her alone to do, we know this as Tom tells how he used to help her when she asked. ...read more.

Conclusion

This relates to Tom's story as well because through his case they realize how racism is wrong and so unfair. Without Tom's case would they have felt so strongly about the how so many people are wrongly treated? Jem especially starts to realize the seriousness of what is happening to Tom and also how unfair of a trial he is having. Jem actually starts to cry because he is frustrated and hurt by what is happening. Tom's case made them into better people. This is another link between Boo and Tom. As you can see Tom and Boo are strongly linked because they are both honest and caring people, mistreated by their own community and society in general. They only set out to do good and are punished without thought to that. Their stories appear to be different but in fact are very similar. They both sure the punishment they receive, the caring and wonderful personalities they both posses, and the way the children both relate and grow and a person due to them. They in fact share very similar stories. ...read more.

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