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Consider the character of Romeo - how would you as a director present him to the audience? How would you show the changes that take place in him during the play?

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Introduction

25th February 2003 Joe McLaughlin 10T English Coursework Consider the character of Romeo - how would you as a director present him to the audience? How would you show the changes that take place in him during the play? The tragedy of Romeo and Juliet centres around the story of two "star-cross'd lovers," (Prologue - Line 6) who share their names with the tittle of the play. Romeo and Juliet is possibly William Shakespeare's best known work, even though it was written in the late 16th century, it's legacy still lives on today. Shakespeare managed to create such a unique perspective on his characters mainly because of his acting background. The tragedy (meaning that all the main characters are doomed to death) begins a fourteen-line sonnet called, "The Prologue." The Prologue is used to create an overview of the play and set the scene for Act 1. Some people dislike the inclusion of the prologue since it "ruins" the suspense of the play, however if I was directing an adaptation of the play then I would leave the prologue in because the name of the play, "The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet" gives away a fair amount of the plot anyway (in the sense that the audience knows by the genre that the main characters will die.) Also, the play was originally wrote in the 16th century and 16th century audiences would leave if they became bored with the play, so Shakespeare added the prologue to keep the audience waiting for the circumstances surrounding the main characters death. ...read more.

Middle

(Act 1 - Scene 1 - Lines 212-213) This is one of many examples of Romeo being "over the top" and lovesick in expressing his love for Rosaline. Therefore in my interpretation Romeo would act very similar to the Romeo in Baz Luhrmann's e.g. lovesick eyes, lots of flouncing around and flowing arm movements etc. This behaviour eventually evolves from being about Rosaline to Juliet. When Romeo meets Juliet in Act 1 Scene 5 he starts acting over the top straight away; "I profane with my unworthiest hand This holy shrine..." (Act 1 - Scene 5 - Lines 92-93) This is typical Romeo. I would have Romeo act these lines in the same way that he acts when he is talking about his love for Rosaline e.g. lovesick eyes and the flowing arm movements. I would do this to restore a sense of trust about Romeo in the audience after all he's just changed the love of his life in seconds and if he acted differently as well then his inconsistency may cause some members of the audience to dislike Romeo. This would be the opposite effect to the effect needed. I would also have Romeo become more active, this would show the audience that he actually loves Juliet and to give the impression that his "love" for Rosaline was in fact lust. This would restore Romeo's character as one that can be trusted and liked by the audience. ...read more.

Conclusion

Then Romeo will drag what is left of Paris' body into the tomb. Then Romeo will enter the main section of the tomb, where Juliet is "buried". When Romeo first sees Juliet, he will break down in tears again since he still can't believe that Juliet is actually dead. When Romeo drinks the poison, he will start shuddering uncontrollably and stumble about. Romeo's face will begin to turn green as the poison takes effect. Then, in one last act of desperation, kisses Juliet (to prove to the audience their true love), sticks his two fingers up towards the roof of the tomb before finally collapsing on the floor. I think this style of ending will suit the character of Romeo well, he keeps his biker image (the gore and swearing etc) whilst still showing his feminine, caring side. Also the ending helps to show "who was to blame" for the tragedy. I believe that it must have been fate that caused Romeo and Juliet to die. This is because in the play there are a number of events that seem too much of a coincidence to not be influenced by fate. Examples of these events are; the fact that there was a potion that would make Juliet seem dead for exactly the right amount of time; that Juliet's body wasn't cremated or buried underground; no one seeing Romeo and Juliet together etc. There are many more events like these that have too smaller probability to all happen without them being linked to fate. However, Romeo and Juliet it ...read more.

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