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Consider the Dramatic Function of Inspector Goole in the play An Inspector Calls.

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Introduction

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Middle

This designates the fact that the inspector could again be either a time-traveller come to teach the Birlings a lesson on selfishness and equality or Priestley himself portraying his message to the audience. I think this because out of the possibilities, in my opinion, these are the only two that could acquire, or already know such extensive knowledge about Eva Smith. A further way in which Priestley helps us to understand the Inspector's role in the play is through the Inspector's own speech. When he first arrives at the Birlings house and throughout the rest of the play, Inspector Goole keeps referring to and describing Eva Smith's death in a distasteful manner, "swallowed a lot of strong disinfectant," "she was in great agony" "her position now is that she lies with a burnt-out inside on a slab." I think this is to create an atmosphere of guilt for the Birlings in the hope that they might seriously consider what part they could have played in this tragedy. From these quotations, we gather that it is unlikely Inspector Goole is a real police inspector due to the gruesome repetition of how Eva Smith died and so, to me, this indicates that the Inspector could be a close relation of Eva's returning to seek his revenge. The questioning techniques used by Inspector Goole are also very important to help us understand his function in the play. ...read more.

Conclusion

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