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Dearest Catherine, Since my last letter, we have experienced some unusual events at Longbourn, but I am sorry to say that I am not able to share any pleasant news with you. I find myself in rather low spirits

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Introduction

Longbourn House Hertfordshire Dearest Catherine, Since my last letter, we have experienced some unusual events at Longbourn, but I am sorry to say that I am not able to share any pleasant news with you. I find myself in rather low spirits for a number of reasons. I should begin with the story of a distant cousin, Mr Collins, who will inherit our house after the death of my dear father, as he is his closest male relative. Mr Collins came to pay us a visit here in Hertfordshire; he himself comes from Hunsford in Kent. He is the most aggravating, weary and long-winded man I have ever met in my entire life. I cannot put it in plain words how I detest him. My father was amused by the man's lack of real intelligence, constant grovelling compliments and apologies that lasted for hours on end! At dinner father scarcely spoke at all, but when the servants were withdrawn he thought it would be polite to have some conversation with his guest, but during dinner, he led Mr Collins to converse about Lady Catherine De Bourgh, his patroness. Amidst his glowing descriptions of the great Lady and her home, Rosings, he would be nothing with out the famous Lady Catherine De Bourgh. He decided to read Fordyce's Sermons to us; the monotonous solemnity went on for three pages! Then Mr Collins participated in a game of backgammon with my father, he was exceptionally hopeless as expected. The next day, my sisters and I walked over to Meryton with my "dear" cousin, and we encountered the Officers staying in Meryton. ...read more.

Middle

Although Darcy and I spoke little during the two dances, I manage to work in Mr Wickham's name just to see what Mr Darcy's response would be. Mr Darcy tried to escape without saying much about Mr Wickham or how he is related to him. I tried another proposal by mentioning how Mr Darcy once claimed that anyone who loses his good opinion has lost it forever, but the dance ended before I could really lay into him about his entire fault. Then Jane came over as soon as the dance had ended to talk with me. She tells me that I am wrong to believe that Mr Darcy has mistreated Mr Wickham as Mr Bingley, who could never do wrong; I told Jane that although he does not know all the details, he does know that Mr Wickham is a rogue. I, however, do not want to believe ill of Mr Wickham. Mr. Collins then embarrasses me by going to introduce himself to Mr Darcy since he has learned that Mr Darcy is the nephew of his patroness, Lady De Bourgh, Oh the shame, Catherine. He looked at Mr Collins as if he were dirt on his shoe. Nevertheless, the embarrassment does not end there. At supper, my mother boasted loudly of her expectations that Bingley will marry Jane. I was humiliated as Mr Darcy was sitting silently across the table hearing every shameful remark that my mother made. I love my family dearly, but after supper, Mary added more to the disgrace by singing for everyone despite her lack of musical talent. ...read more.

Conclusion

I knew why Miss Bingley did this; she wants to get closer to Mr Darcy. Miss Bingley sent Jane another letter to tell her that they are not coming back to Netherfield. Under the pretence of affection, Miss Bingley also confides to Jane that her brother, Mr Bingley, and Miss Darcy grow closer each day. Jane's hopes are ruined and I was furious, as I believe that Mr Bingley does like Jane, but is being manipulated by his self-serving sisters and Mr Darcy. Jane, however, chose to believe that Mr Bingley's sisters are just pushing Miss Darcy to get together with him because that will be the best decision for his happiness. Mother caused Jane more pain about Mr Bingley by constantly talking about him. Once it is certain that Mr Bingley and Mr Darcy are not coming back to Netherfield, Mr Wickham tells everyone in Meryton how Mr Darcy cheated him out of his rightful inheritance, although Mr Wickham had told me that he would not make these accusations public out of respect for Mr Darcy's dead father. However, I guess he could not have resisted as the anger and hatred of Mr Darcy boiled up inside him. All of Meryton feels justified in hating Darcy now even though they have disliked him all along because he is proud and superior. We have been very busy, as you have seen. I cannot believe how abominable Mr Darcy could be, or Miss Bingley. Please write back. I miss you dearly. Come and visit us sometime in Longbourn, with your mother and father. I must go to bed now, it is very late. Yours truly, Elizabeth Bennet ...read more.

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