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Discuss how Dickens establishes the identity of young pip at the start of the novel

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Introduction

Discuss how Dickens establishes the identity of young pip at the start of the novel? Great expectation is a novel about a young boy who grows up to be a man with great expectations. He goes to London from the marches of Kent to become a gentleman. 'Great expectations', a Bildungsroman, (a novel which traces the spiritual, moral' psychological or social development and growth of the protagonist from childhood to maturity) explores themes such as ambitions, money, class, self knowledge, justice, humanity, and pride. The novel is seen as semi autobiographical, as dickens has written the novel in first person narrative. Dickens explores the issues of class education and the penal system throughout the novel as pip is the narrator of the novel, this tells us what he thinks now that he has become mature and it also shows the reader the way he looks back and thinks that he was foolish when he was young. In chapter one the reader learns that Pip "never saw" his father or mother. His parents died when he was small, leaving Pip alone. This makes the reader feel pity for Pip as he doesn't have a father or mother. ...read more.

Middle

Dickens had used the term "blade to blade" to suggest that pip is being dangerous and the convict can kill him. Pip is frightened by the "spider's web, hanging from twig to twig", he is terrified that it might fall on him. Pip feels guilty and fearful as he is doing something he shouldn't be doing. A ghostly feeling is created by the "oppressed conscience like a phantom". This shows that Pip is scared of ghosts and feels that there is a ghost that is watching him. The setting, "marsh mist was so thick", explains what kind of place Pip is in and it seems as a sinister, cold and gloomy place. Charles Dickens shows Pips feelings by the setting used; he has also used menacing word to show how terrified Pip is. In chapter eight, pip visits Miss Havisham's home. He is confronted with a strange environment and with two different people, who he has never met before. Dickens shows the obvious class difference between Pip and Miss Havisham. "She was dressed in rich materials-satin, laces and silks", this description shows that Miss Havisham is wealthy as she wears expensive clothes. This contrast with Pips "thick boots" which indicates that Miss Havisham is socially superior to Pip realises he is a working class and feels "humiliated, hurt, spurned, offended, angry and sorry". ...read more.

Conclusion

Pip has started feeling discomfited of where he lives and how it looks because it is not the way an upper class house would look like. Pip has become more aware of the class system and the novel has linked onto a Bildungsroman as great expectation talks about everything involved in a Bildungsroman since it talks about Pips life like an autobiography. It also ancestry and education, as the protagonist Pip has lost his father and Pip has not been educated. Great expectation also talks about Pip's desire, going to London and becoming a gentleman. As well as talking about Pips desires Charles Dickens has also mentioned Pips social life and the conditions he lives in. The other theme that makes Great Expectation similar to a Bildungsroman is love the fact that Pip is falling in love with Estella. As Pip is the narrator of the novel you get two perspectives as Pip tells story of younger Pip. Pip is also small and uneducated. The reader knows the feelings of Pip as he is the narrating it himself. Dickens wants the reader to feel pity for Pip. Dickens tries to tell us what Pip is like in the beginning. Dickens is successful in establishing Pips character, as he makes the reader feel pity for Pip. Dickens wants the reader to find out Pips thoughts now that he is older. ?? ?? ?? ?? Charmee Gandhi ...read more.

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