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Discuss the representations of love and hate in the opening scenes of Romeo and Juliet. You may refer to recent film adaptations.

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Introduction

'Here's much to do with hate, but more with love.' Discuss the representations of love and hate in the opening scenes of Romeo and Juliet. You may Refer to recent film adaptations. Love and hate are both expressed very strongly throughout the play, and can sometimes come as quite a shock. The play is about two big families who we know have had a grudge for a very long time, 'from ancient grudge break to new mutiny'. This is said in the prologue. The main story is about two lovers, one from each of the families, who start a passionate fight to be together. The prologue also hints to us that the story will not have a happy ending. 'A pair of star-crossed lovers take their lives'. This is suggesting that there will be suicide involved between Romeo and Juliet. But not as peacefully as it sounds it seems. First looking at the prologue, the audience is made to think that hate is the more dominating emotion in the play ...read more.

Middle

This could mean Romeo is very immature when it comes to love. The next type of love is that of Juliet and Paris. This is an arranged marriage, which did not come through, decided by Juliet's parents against her will, which is definitely not how Paris felt. 'Younger than she are happy mothers made.' This quote is telling us that Paris thinks Juliet is old enough to be getting married and shows he may also be wanting children, or, maybe just the sex. Saying that there are younger mothers that are happy means that he thinks she is the right age for him. We know Juliet is not interested in Paris through quotes such as, 'it is an honour that I dream not of.' This is her response to her mother asking Juliet's feelings on the proposed marriage. Now, the main form of love, and the strongest in the play, the 'true love between Romeo and Juliet. ...read more.

Conclusion

'Draw, if you be men', and, 'I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee. Have at thee coward.' Both the quotes are from different families which shows us that no single family cause all the trouble. This is different in the film as the Capulets are the ones that begin to fight the seemingly more cowardly Montagues. You could say that the families hatred is what kills Romeo and Juliet, but I believe love to be the bigger factor as both of them commit suicide thinking that the other one is dead. They must have loved each over an extreme amount to take there own lives at the thought of living without each over. Although I have said this, love alone did not cause the deaths as hatred was what built up to that point, without the hatred, Romeo and Juliet could have married peacefully and gotten on with the rest of their lives. There was no reason for the families to hate each over, it was just because of a pointless, 'ancient feud'. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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