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Enchanted hair

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Introduction

Enchanted hair Ann Jones was my best friend Lisa's little sister. She had not made any particular impression on me. Among the children in her class she was not known for brightness at her lessons, or for liveliness in class. But, by the time Lisa spoken to me about her, I was aware of Ann as a particularly stable and pleasant girl. Stable seems an odd word to describe a six-year-old, yet it seems to be her vital quality. She was always polite and friendly. Her appearance was no way exceptional, yet there was something neat about her. Her shining hair was fair, beautifully brushed and neatly plaited; her big grey eyes were always serious to what was going on. She seemed a model pupil, and, though she never came top in any subject apart from spelling, she seemed unlikely ever to cause her parents or teachers the slightest worry. It was, therefore, a huge surprise when Lisa came to see me, clearly distressed, one night just as I was about to go to bed. "Tiffany, I'm sorry to trouble you so late, but I'm worried about Ann, I don't know what to do for the best." ...read more.

Middle

"Did you mention this to Dr Somers?" "Well, I did. I didn't take Ann to the surgery because I thought It may scare her, I just told him, and he fairly snapped my head off and said she was a perfectly healthy child and not to fuss him with a bit of kid's play." "Well, what did you want me to do, Lisa?" "Oh, tiffany, if you could just talk to Ann about it a bit! She thinks the world of you could just reason this nonsense out of her head - " She looked at me rather blankly, so I promised that I would see what I could do. "Supposing I take Ann for a walk, tomorrow, after school. So it won't seem like an interview." "Tiffany, I don't know how to thank you -" I pointed out that I haven't done anything yet, but she went away clearly relieved to have pushed the responsibility on to somebody else, even if only temporarily. Next afternoon Ann agreed, to take a walk with me. I thought there was no sense in putting off the question, so as soon as we were away from her house, I said, "Your sister asked me to talk to you, about this idea you have that - er, that people are living in your hair." ...read more.

Conclusion

"Quid nunc it per iter tenebricosum - " "Illuc," I said it with her, "unde negant redire quemquam." "You know that too?" she said, turning the grey eyes on me. "I have heard it, yes. What was the people's town called, the town that sank in the sea?" "It was called Is." "Can you hear them now?" I asked. "Yes. Just now their holy men are very worried," she said, turning to me, frowning she looked oddly like her sister. "Why are they worried, Ann?" "They have signs from, the ones who can tell the future, that there is going to be another very bad happening and that they are going to have to move again, and all the people with their things. Oh!" she cried, I hope Mum isn't going to cut off all my hair! She said she might do that! Please tell her not to, Tiffany!" "All right Ann, don't worry. I'll tell her." "I, needless to say was wondering what to do, and hardly looked where I was going. Which is why I didn't hear the car till it was right behind us. It was young, feckless Jack Fish. He's now in jail, doing time for manslaughter. People said I'd had a breakdown after that, and everyone was very sorry for me. But actually it's a lot simpler. What happened was, the Veneti transferred from Ann's head to mine. ...read more.

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