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GCSE: Taming of the Shrew

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  1. Appearance and Personality in Taming of The Shrew

    Even her name, which means 'white,' implies purity. Her acceptance of her father Baptista's claim that she will not be allowed to marry until her older sister Katherine does is almost angel-like. However, in most art depictions of Bianca, she?s not the prettiest girl. If Bianca was portrayed as someone whose beauty was overwhelming, how she would be treated and act like would be quite different. While her treatment would still be positive, Bianca might build up a giant ego.

    • Word count: 916

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • 'The taming of the shrew' - Examine carefully your chosen scene and discuss how well in your view Shakespeare succeeds in presenting good theatre with a variety of dramatic situations in order to entertain his audience.

    "So to conclude, I think that Shakespeare does a good job of entertaining his audience and keeping the humour varied to keep everyone happy. He manages to lower the tone in the play from 'jokey' to serious well. All through the play he uses lots of different types of humour and uses lots of dramatic devices to entertain further. Jennii Calder 10FF"

  • Analyse the Presentation of the Servant-Master Relationship in 'The Taming of the Shrew'

    "At the end of the play, it seems that Shakespeare has submitted to the traditional orthodox beliefs of his society. However, the 'Sly' scene does not come to a close and this loose end still questions the seemingly definitive conclusion, which was Katherine's speech. At the end of the play, Tranio, the servant, still remains in an almost equal position to the other men and takes part in the wagering of the husbands. The very last lines of the play are oddly inconclusive and possibly suggest a doubt as to whether Kate's transformation is genuine. Lucentio in utter amazement, says "'Tis a wonder, by your leave, she will be tamed so". He almost seems to doubt that she could possibly change so completely. Throughout 'the Taming of the Shrew', Shakespeare makes clear that the "old" system functions, if with glitches, and that it is easy to fit into, but he also suggests that there is an alternative to the traditional roles of masters and servants, and even wives and husbands."

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