• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Examine the Dramatic Significance of the Theme 'Fair Is Foul' In Macbeth.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

��ࡱ�>�� EG����D�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������5@ ��0rHbjbj�2�2 (V�X�X�=�������������������8� �$�7v""""""""�������$�R���"""""���""����"�"�"��"�������" �%��o���"X��07� z ������� �� ""�"""""���EXAMINE THE DRAMATIC SIGNIFICANCE OF THE THEME 'FAIR IS FOUL' IN MACBETH 'Fair is Foul' is the major theme in Macbeth and is present throughout the play in both the characters and the events. 'Fair is Foul' refers to the contrast of good and evil in the play, since Macbeth commits many evil murders for what seem to be good reasons. There are several false and secretive characters, such as the Witches, Macbeth and Lady Macbeth, because of the contradiction of good and evil. Therefore the theme of 'Fair is Foul' is also linked to the theme of appearances being deceiving. As a result of this theme lots of chaos, lies, secrets and total disorder are caused. The three Witches introduce the theme of 'Fair is Foul' in Macbeth and are the first characters seen in the play: "Fair is foul, and foul is fair". Their words seem to contradict each other, presenting the idea of illusion versus reality in the play. The fact that the Witches are in the first scene of Macbeth confirms that they are important characters and main devices of evil. They meet in foul weather and talk of "thunder, lightning" and "the fog and filthy air", giving the audience a first impression that Macbeth is a dark, dangerous play in which the theme of evil is central. Only once in the play are the three weird sisters called 'witches', instead they are called "old hags" and "elemental forces". Shakespeare describes the witches in this way to make them sound more evil so that the audience would dislike them more. Shakespeare used the witches and supernatural influences to present evil scenes and events. As witches were hated at the time that Shakespeare wrote the play, he used the witches so that the audience would be more interested and entertained in the play. ...read more.

Middle

Macbeth no longer has any motivation and soon realises that his own death is near: "And all our yesterday have lighted fools The way to dusty death." This gives the impression that Macbeth has woken up out of the spell and now wishes that he had never been poisoned by ambition in the first place. At the end of the play Macduff describes Macbeth as "A dead butcher", which contradicts Duncan's original description of "noble Macbeth". Lady Macbeth's character changes drastically throughout the play, linking her to the theme of 'fair is foul' as she goes between good and evil. When she receives the news of the witches prophecies regarding her husband she reacts in an extremely powerful and dramatic way. As this is the first time that Lady Macbeth is seen in the play, the audience is given the impression that she is a very strong character. As soon as she has finished reading Macbeth's letter she has decided she will make sure Macbeth is king: "Glamis thou art, and Cawdor, and shalt be What thou art promised." It is as if her and her husband are thinking the same thing, which is a source of strength for both of them. Lady Macbeth doesn't hesitate for a moment about her decision. Lady Macbeth invites the evil spirits to enter her: "Come you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full Of direst cruelty" This was a well known sign of a person under the possession of evil spirits at the time the play was written. Lady Macbeth knows that she has to strengthen herself, that the murder will need evil power. Evil is obviously not naturally in Lady Macbeth and she asks the evil spirits to stop her natural feelings of guilt to come between her intention and fulfilment: "Stop th' access and passage to remorse, That no compunctious vistings of nature Shake fell purpose, nor keep peace between Th' effect and it." ...read more.

Conclusion

Shakespeare's main reasons for writing Macbeth were to flatter King James I and to keep the interest of his audience. This is shown by the fact that Banquo, named after James' ancestor, is portrayed as a good and honest character. Shakespeare also wrote about witches and evil witchcraft, which were considered wrong and morbid at the time. Women were considered to be most likely to relate to witchcraft, which is perhaps why Lady Macbeth seemed to be more controlled than Macbeth in the play. This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ �E�E2F3F�F�FGG�G�G�G�GlHmHqHrH������������haBhaBOJQJhaBhaBCJOJQJ%haBhaBOJQJfHq� ����)haBhaBCJOJQJfHq� ����haBhH� hH�haBIJ� � � � ������FGno��IJ#$��ef�, �����������������������������gdH��EqH��, - � � $!%!�!�!�"�"�#�#�$�$]%^%�'�'�*�*�,�,s-t-�.�.00�2�2�����������������������������gdH��2e4f4�5�5�7�7O8P8 9 9H;I;�<�<�?�?�A�A�E3F4F5F6F�F�F�F�F���������������������������$a$gdaBgdH��FGGGG�G�G�G�G�G�G�G�GmHnHoHpHqHrH������������������gdH�$a$gdaB$a$gdaB&1�h:pH���/ ��=!�'"�'#��$��%��D@�D NormalCJ_H aJmH nHsH tHDA@�D Default Paragraph FontRi�R Table Normal�4� l4�a� (k�(No ListDZ@�D H� Plain TextCJOJQJ^JaJ4@4 aBHeader ���!4 @4 aBFooter ���!`�o"` aBwatermark header$a$CJOJQJfHq� ����N�o2N aBwatermark footer$a$ CJOJQJr@V����r�V�:��rH%, �2�FrH&()*qH'�=�=4>6>�>�>??�?�?�?�?n@s@s@��alex�aBH��@�=|(3r@P@��Unknown������������G��z ��Times New Roman5V��Symbol3&� �z ��Arial7&� � �VerdanaG5�� �����h�MS Mincho-�3� fg?5� �z ��Courier New"1���h�T���T���T�� 3/ 3/$�������4�=�=3�� H�?������������������H���HEXAMINE THE DRAMATIC SIGNIFICANCE OF THE THEME 'FAIR IS FOUL' IN MACBETHTCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedTCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibitedalexalex�� ��Oh��+'��0����Td� 0< X d p |�����IEXAMINE THE DRAMATIC SIGNIFICANCE OF THE THEME 'FAIR IS FOUL' IN MACBETHwUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedualexewoUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibitedu>Downloaded from Coursework.Info - http://www.coursework.info/is Normal.dotfalexl.d2exMicrosoft Word 10.0@@~��o��@~��o��@~��o�� 3�� ��Õ.��+,��D��Õ.��+,���d���H����� ���� � E�UCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibited'UCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibited'UCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibited'>/�=A IEXAMINE THE DRAMATIC SIGNIFICANCE OF THE THEME 'FAIR IS FOUL' IN MACBETH Titled@���+K_PID_LINKBASE CopyrightDownloaded FromCan RedistributeOwner�A4http://www.coursework.comcoursework.comehttp://www.coursework.comNCNo, do not redistributecoursework.com/ !"#$%&'()*+����-./0123����56789:;����=>?@ABC��������F����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������Root Entry�������� �Fp��o��H�1Table��������,WordDocument��������(VSummaryInformation(����4DocumentSummaryInformation8������������<CompObj������������j������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ���� �FMicrosoft Word Document MSWordDocWord.Document.8�9�q ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Macbeth section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Macbeth essays

  1. Macbeth: How does Shakespeare dramatise the murder of Duncan in Act II Scenes (i) ...

    and therefore Cawdor shall sleep no more, Macbeth shall sleep no more' (Act 2, Scene 2, Line 45-6) This repetition of his different roles shows him slowly falling to pieces because of what he does, and also shows how much he is trying to find a way to make it

  2. 'Macbeth' gives us a classic example of the literary definition of a 'tragic hero'. ...

    This furthering of his own cause - the brutal reign, consultation of the witches and murder of Macduff's family - is carried out by Macbeth alone without his wife's aid. The next time Lady Macbeth is seen after this scene is in Act Five Scene One.

  1. What is the Significance of the Witches in Macbeth?

    To so this Shakespeare uses a crude, traditional stereotype of a witch - doing this meant the audience can immediately recognise and see that it is a witch on stage. James I was fascinated by witchcraft and using the three witches would please him, which Shakespeare wanted, as discussed in the earlier paragraph.

  2. Look like the innocent flower, but be a serpent undert How does Shakespeare ...

    This quote is interesting as we do not know whether he is hallucinating because the witches are controlling his mind or whether he is obsessed with murdering King Duncan. The mind controls what you see and what you don't besides the physical tangible real world, Shakespeare is telling the reader

  1. Imagery Of Appearance and Reality in Macbeth

    In Act I,Sc.vii, Macbeth says "...and I have bought Golden opinions from all sorts of people, Which would be worn now in their newest gloss Not cast aside so soon." Here he is proud of his new clothes and happy to wear what he has really earned.

  2. English Coursework - Macbeth

    his curiosity of whether killing Duncan would make the prediction that he will be King become true. When Macbeth and Banquo first speak about the witches' predictions, they are sarcastic and joke about them, but when Macbeth discovers he is Thane of Cawdor and one of his predictions have came

  1. Consider the roles of Macbeth, Lady Macbeth, and the Witches

    We also see in the first act echo's within Macbeth's language of the witches, at the end of Act 1 Scene 1 the audience sees the witches all chant 'Fair is foul, and foul is fair,' Then within the space of 2 scenes and contained in the first line Macbeth

  2. The Significance of Power in Macbeth

    From the beginning of the play, both Macbeth and Banquo are shown to be ambitious, but the way they react to the witches prophecies are very different. After the prophecy that he will become the Thane of Cawdor comes true, Macbeth says to Banquo, ?Do you not hope your children

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work