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Examine the Dramatic Significance of the Theme 'Fair Is Foul' In Macbeth.

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Introduction

��ࡱ�>�� EG����D�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������5@ ��0rHbjbj�2�2 (V�X�X�=�������������������8� �$�7v""""""""�������$�R���"""""���""����"�"�"��"�������" �%��o���"X��07� z ������� �� ""�"""""���EXAMINE THE DRAMATIC SIGNIFICANCE OF THE THEME 'FAIR IS FOUL' IN MACBETH 'Fair is Foul' is the major theme in Macbeth and is present throughout the play in both the characters and the events. 'Fair is Foul' refers to the contrast of good and evil in the play, since Macbeth commits many evil murders for what seem to be good reasons. There are several false and secretive characters, such as the Witches, Macbeth and Lady Macbeth, because of the contradiction of good and evil. Therefore the theme of 'Fair is Foul' is also linked to the theme of appearances being deceiving. As a result of this theme lots of chaos, lies, secrets and total disorder are caused. The three Witches introduce the theme of 'Fair is Foul' in Macbeth and are the first characters seen in the play: "Fair is foul, and foul is fair". Their words seem to contradict each other, presenting the idea of illusion versus reality in the play. The fact that the Witches are in the first scene of Macbeth confirms that they are important characters and main devices of evil. They meet in foul weather and talk of "thunder, lightning" and "the fog and filthy air", giving the audience a first impression that Macbeth is a dark, dangerous play in which the theme of evil is central. Only once in the play are the three weird sisters called 'witches', instead they are called "old hags" and "elemental forces". Shakespeare describes the witches in this way to make them sound more evil so that the audience would dislike them more. Shakespeare used the witches and supernatural influences to present evil scenes and events. As witches were hated at the time that Shakespeare wrote the play, he used the witches so that the audience would be more interested and entertained in the play. ...read more.

Middle

Macbeth no longer has any motivation and soon realises that his own death is near: "And all our yesterday have lighted fools The way to dusty death." This gives the impression that Macbeth has woken up out of the spell and now wishes that he had never been poisoned by ambition in the first place. At the end of the play Macduff describes Macbeth as "A dead butcher", which contradicts Duncan's original description of "noble Macbeth". Lady Macbeth's character changes drastically throughout the play, linking her to the theme of 'fair is foul' as she goes between good and evil. When she receives the news of the witches prophecies regarding her husband she reacts in an extremely powerful and dramatic way. As this is the first time that Lady Macbeth is seen in the play, the audience is given the impression that she is a very strong character. As soon as she has finished reading Macbeth's letter she has decided she will make sure Macbeth is king: "Glamis thou art, and Cawdor, and shalt be What thou art promised." It is as if her and her husband are thinking the same thing, which is a source of strength for both of them. Lady Macbeth doesn't hesitate for a moment about her decision. Lady Macbeth invites the evil spirits to enter her: "Come you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full Of direst cruelty" This was a well known sign of a person under the possession of evil spirits at the time the play was written. Lady Macbeth knows that she has to strengthen herself, that the murder will need evil power. Evil is obviously not naturally in Lady Macbeth and she asks the evil spirits to stop her natural feelings of guilt to come between her intention and fulfilment: "Stop th' access and passage to remorse, That no compunctious vistings of nature Shake fell purpose, nor keep peace between Th' effect and it." ...read more.

Conclusion

Shakespeare's main reasons for writing Macbeth were to flatter King James I and to keep the interest of his audience. This is shown by the fact that Banquo, named after James' ancestor, is portrayed as a good and honest character. Shakespeare also wrote about witches and evil witchcraft, which were considered wrong and morbid at the time. Women were considered to be most likely to relate to witchcraft, which is perhaps why Lady Macbeth seemed to be more controlled than Macbeth in the play. This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ �E�E2F3F�F�FGG�G�G�G�GlHmHqHrH������������haBhaBOJQJhaBhaBCJOJQJ%haBhaBOJQJfHq� ����)haBhaBCJOJQJfHq� ����haBhH� hH�haBIJ� � � � ������FGno��IJ#$��ef�, �����������������������������gdH��EqH��, - � � $!%!�!�!�"�"�#�#�$�$]%^%�'�'�*�*�,�,s-t-�.�.00�2�2�����������������������������gdH��2e4f4�5�5�7�7O8P8 9 9H;I;�<�<�?�?�A�A�E3F4F5F6F�F�F�F�F���������������������������$a$gdaBgdH��FGGGG�G�G�G�G�G�G�G�GmHnHoHpHqHrH������������������gdH�$a$gdaB$a$gdaB&1�h:pH���/ ��=!�'"�'#��$��%��D@�D NormalCJ_H aJmH nHsH tHDA@�D Default Paragraph FontRi�R Table Normal�4� l4�a� (k�(No ListDZ@�D H� Plain TextCJOJQJ^JaJ4@4 aBHeader ���!4 @4 aBFooter ���!`�o"` aBwatermark header$a$CJOJQJfHq� ����N�o2N aBwatermark footer$a$ CJOJQJr@V����r�V�:��rH%, �2�FrH&()*qH'�=�=4>6>�>�>??�?�?�?�?n@s@s@��alex�aBH��@�=|(3r@P@��Unknown������������G��z ��Times New Roman5V��Symbol3&� �z ��Arial7&� � �VerdanaG5�� �����h�MS Mincho-�3� fg?5� �z ��Courier New"1���h�T���T���T�� 3/ 3/$�������4�=�=3�� H�?������������������H���HEXAMINE THE DRAMATIC SIGNIFICANCE OF THE THEME 'FAIR IS FOUL' IN MACBETHTCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedTCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibitedalexalex�� ��Oh��+'��0����Td� 0< X d p |�����IEXAMINE THE DRAMATIC SIGNIFICANCE OF THE THEME 'FAIR IS FOUL' IN MACBETHwUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution ProhibitedualexewoUCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibitedu>Downloaded from Coursework.Info - http://www.coursework.info/is Normal.dotfalexl.d2exMicrosoft Word 10.0@@~��o��@~��o��@~��o�� 3�� ��Õ.��+,��D��Õ.��+,���d���H����� ���� � E�UCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibited'UCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibited'UCoursework.Info Coursework - http://www.coursework.info/ - Redistribution Prohibited'>/�=A IEXAMINE THE DRAMATIC SIGNIFICANCE OF THE THEME 'FAIR IS FOUL' IN MACBETH Titled@���+K_PID_LINKBASE CopyrightDownloaded FromCan RedistributeOwner�A4http://www.coursework.comcoursework.comehttp://www.coursework.comNCNo, do not redistributecoursework.com/ !"#$%&'()*+����-./0123����56789:;����=>?@ABC��������F����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������Root Entry�������� �Fp��o��H�1Table��������,WordDocument��������(VSummaryInformation(����4DocumentSummaryInformation8������������<CompObj������������j������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ���� �FMicrosoft Word Document MSWordDocWord.Document.8�9�q ...read more.

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