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Examine the importance of Emily Bront's authorical purpose in Wuthering Heights pp 1-21.

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Introduction

Examine the importance of Emily Bront�'s authorical purpose in Wuthering Heights pp 1-21. Lindsey Brown During the essay it is intended for the reader to search deep into the text to find hidden meanings to enhance their knowledge of the novel, resulting in discovering Bront�'s purpose for using the kind of descriptive language that is portrayed throughout the novel. As the narrator begins to read the book it is noticed that much religious language is used throughout the first chapter, however, it is noted that particular references to hell and the devil are made, rather than God. It is thought that Bront�'s purpose here was in particular reference to the genre of the book, which is gothic horror, this is noticed throughout the whole novel due to the references made to violence, horror and the paranormal. "Go to the deuce!" - Heathcliff As the book is read further is it noticed that many horrific words are used continuously to enhance the mystery and feeling. Also it places a picture in the readers' mind of the moors and what they were like. ...read more.

Middle

"Above the chimney were sundry old villainous old guns" - Lockwood As chapter two begins it can evidently be seen that the theme of violence spills over into the weather conditions, Bront�'s purpose here is to emphasise the horror elements of the novel. The weather conditions are symbolic here as it informs the reader that more violent events will occur later on in the chapter. "The snow began to drive thickly." - Lockwood The discourtesy of the residents at Wuthering Heights can again be seen here in this chapter, as Lockwood receives an extremely rude reception when he arrives at Heathcliff's home. "She never opened her mouth. I stared- she stared also." - Lockwood It is assumed that Bront�'s principle is to not present too many clues about the characters at this point in the narrative, as it is her intention to keep the reader guessing and in the state of wonderment. As the book is continued the reference to the weather is repeated to lay emphasis on the violence and lingering atmosphere of Wuthering Heights. As the weather conditions proceed to get worse it is considered that Emily's reason for this was to prepare the reader for more sadistic events. ...read more.

Conclusion

" Catherine Earnshaw, here and there then varied to Catherine Heathcliff, and then again to Catherine Linton" - Lockwood Throughout the entire chapter there is much reference to hell and violence. Bront�'s purpose here is to create an atmosphere ready for more dramatic events. "We each sought a separate nook to await his advent" -Lockwood As the night progresses in the novel Lockwood begins to have a nightmare, this is where the violence and paranormal events really commence. This again relates back to the genre of gothic horror as a ghost appears, however this is not in Lockwood's dream, this is real. Emily's purpose here is to provide the reader with more clues, as the spectre is named Catherine Linton. She also places more emphasis upon the theme of violence and terror as the supernatural element sets in. " My fingers closed on the little fingers of a little, ice cold hand!" - Lockwood In conclusion, Emily Bront�'s hidden purposes within the text play an immensely important part to this novel as it provides the reader with a deeper knowledge and understanding of the written context and hidden meanings behind certain words and specific themes. Words: 972 ...read more.

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