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Explain how Shakespeare uses his language and structure to reflect the theme of battle

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Introduction

Explain how Shakespeare uses his language and structure to reflect the theme of battle The theme of battle is present throughout 'Much Ado About Nothing', whether it be with malicious intentions, in playful jest or between wit and emotions. It is an aspect of the play that provokes much interest within the audience and enables the character's relationships with each other to be seen with more clarity. Shakespeare achieves this with his use of language and the structure of the scenes and dialogue. There are several battles between many characters. The obvious battle of Beatrice and Benedick is a 'merry war' and a journey of self discovery aided by the deception of friends. However, there are more vicious battles like that of Don John's quest of destruction which seems to be fueled by the apparent jealousy that he has for his brother, Don Pedro. The language used is of vital assistance within the play, conjuring imagery associated with battle and playing on words to create banter and a certain degree of humour. ...read more.

Middle

'Some Cupid Kills with arrows, some with traps' The language used is reflective of the false pretences that Hero and Ursula are creating to make Beatrice believe that Benedick is in love with her. It is a trap, not a chance meeting that has resulted in love. The use of puns and playing on words assists the battles, not only by occasionally creating confusion, but by also dropping in subtle suggestions in often non-offensive tones. The battle that exists between Leonato and Beatrice is friendly and therefore the dialogue is light hearted to listen to; '...thou wilt never get thee a husband if thou be so shrewd of thy tongue.' This refers to Beatrice's tongue and her quick-witted nature, which results in sharp responses but it is also a pun because when putting the play in context we know that 'shrews' were wives who continually told their husbands off. This does hold a certain element of truth in it because it is probable that if Beatrice was to be married she would be a domineering wife with a quick tongue. ...read more.

Conclusion

Shakespeare uses language in this manner to associate the character with something that it often considered in a negative light, like disease in this case. The use of repetition reiterates a point and strengthens an argument. When Claudio, Leonato and Don Pedro are acting that Beatrice loves Benedick they are battling against Benedick by creating false affections. 'O God, counterfeit? There was never counterfeit of passion came so near the life of passion as she discovers it.' Leonato appears alliterate because this use of repetition conveys Beatrice's so-called affection with more clarity. It also portrays to the audience how false the story is because it appears as if the character is reassuring his lie. This also reflects the theme of battle between truth and lie because Benedick is unaware which is which. Structure * Short, sharp, snappy language enhances bantering * Soliloquy * The use of ASIDE * Structure of the deceptions are the same Conclusion * The overall effect of the devices * Their purpose and effect on the play * Explain HOW * * * * ...read more.

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