• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Explain how the events on the marshes and at Satis house have a powerful impact on Pip.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Explain how the events on the marshes and at Satis house have a powerful impact on Pip. The marshes and Satis House are both places mentioned in the book which have a strong impact on Pip's life. They introduced him to death, the class barrier and the feeling of guilt; guilt for being alive as well as the fear of imprisonment. In this essay I will attempt to discover why and how these places affected Pip. The marshes surrounded the house where Pip grew up so he had been around them all his life. They were called 'the meshes' by the locals and described by Dickens as a 'bleak place', 'a dark, flat wilderness' with 'a low leaden line beyond'. These are unpleasant images and reflect how Pip feels about the marshes. They conjure up the image of death, smothering everything. They even contain a graveyard, where Pip's mother, father and little brothers are buried. He calls them 'little stone lozenges' due to the shape of the headstones and imagines them to have been born 'on their back with their hands in their pockets, and had never taken them out in this state of existence'. ...read more.

Middle

This shows us that Pip is actually a very nice and caring boy, not a criminal as Mrs. Joe would have us believe. She is always telling Pip that he will end up in the hulks and will amount to nothing and these words add to the thoughts in Pip's mind that he is destined for prison. She treats him like a criminal and talks to him akin to this. Also when the Christmas meal is in progress, she makes Pip feel like a criminal by using legal language, telling everybody present 'of all the illnesses I had been guilty of and all the acts of sleeplessness I had committed.' She also makes him feel guilty of being born by explaining of 'all the times she had wished me in my grave, and I had contumaciously refused to go there.' The events at Satis house also have a very poignant effect on Pip. It is here that he receives more knowledge and more feelings about crime and death. The house itself is described as a house which was made of old brick and was dismal, and 'had a great many iron bars to it. ...read more.

Conclusion

He was feeling guilty then as well, he feels guilty for being born. Miss Havisham is also a mirror of Magwitch, as they are both dirt covered and consumed by their past and a need for revenge. When he goes back to tell his uncle and Mrs. Joe of what happened at Satis house, he makes up elaborate lies to hide the embarrassment of what actually happened. Although, even in his fabrications, he puts himself in a lowly position, by saying he sat at the back of the coach, where the driver would sit, 'I got up behind the coach to eat mine, because she told me to.' However, he feels that he cannot deceive Joe and so tells him the truth, but then asks him why he taught him wrongly about 'knaves' and 'jacks'. This is the first sign of him acting superior to his friends and family. Overall Pip becomes much more prejudiced and class aware from his visit to Satis House, a snob almost, abandoning his friends and family. When he becomes rich he does not automatically become a gentleman, he has to learn humility, helped by his friend Herbert Pocket. Also the house and the marshes have a lasting impression on him, making him think of himself of a criminal bound for the hulks or the gibbet. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Great Expectations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Great Expectations essays

  1. Free essay

    Great Expectations. Discuss how the theme of class is developed through Pips visit to ...

    This could be because he thinks that Estella is more important because of her upper class background or whether it is because of his upbringing - Mrs Joe and Joe taught him to respect everyone no matter what class they are.

  2. Describe in detail, Pip's first visit to Satis House and how the visit and ...

    Miss Havisham tells Pip that she wants to see him play. To this command he had no such idea of what to do. He had a sudden thought to gallop round the room in an assumed character of Mr Pumblechook chaise cart, but felt so unequal to the performance that he dismissed the idea straight away.

  1. Compare and Contrast Pips Life on the Marshes to his Life in London.

    He thinks that he is below Mr Wopsle's great aunts class when in fact he is quite the opposite. He is looking at a child's poem and describes it as "literature", taking it very seriously. This shows that Pip is quite obtuse as in fact he is trying to become

  2. Great Expectations - Discuss how the theme of class is developed through Pips visit ...

    They had no school at the beginning of the Victorian era as children had to work to help their parents. A number of families then considered moving to towns to get jobs. Town children lived in overcrowded streets which quickly became slums; children had to share one bed or sleep

  1. Essay Title: Discuss How The Theme Of Class Is Developed Through Pips Visit ...

    bit bias to be honest, because all Dickens' fantasies about the rich being evil, rude and a bit crazy are fitted into one character especially and her eerie house. One time, Miss Havisham questions Pip in such a way at one point, that he gets scared out of his wits

  2. Satis house has been described as the

    The story begins in the "bleak" marshes of where Pip had lived his whole life up to now. They not only add a perfect reflection to Pip's life, but they also add a dark and mysterious place to set the scene for Pip's petrifying encounter with the convict, Magwitch.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work