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Explain the Relationship between Juliet and her Nurse.

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Introduction

Explain the Relationship between Juliet and her Nurse There are many changes in the relationship between Juliet and her Nurse throughout the play "Romeo and Juliet". All through the play, the nurse continually appears. Trust, protection, mischief, willingness and the loving care of Juliet by the Nurse are all shown. At the beginning of the plot, their relationship is clear. The Nurse shows a lot of affection for Juliet, as soon as they are both introduced in the play (Act I Scene 3 Line4). This is the scene where we gather her background information, and where she is reminiscing about the past. She is closer to the Juliet than Juliet's own parents, as Juliet's parents rely on the Nurse to look after and raise Juliet, and to spend time with her. This is so because Lady and Lord Capulet are both always too busy and do not seem to spend any time with Juliet. As Juliet grows up, she plays an important role in the Nurse's life, as it was the Nurse who was Juliet's wet nurse; the Nurse's real daughter Susan had unfortunately died. Susan was born on the same day as Juliet and so this is why the Nurse remembers Juliet's exact date and time of birth. It would remain in her memory because the death of her own child. One example of their close relationship is seen when the Nurse says, 'On Lammas Eve at night she shall be fourteen,' and 'Come Lammas Eve at night she be fourteen' show this. ...read more.

Middle

Juliet is so deeply in love with Romeo that not even her Nurse can hold her back. In act 2 scene 4, the Nurse appears when Romeo is talking with his friends. The Nurse is being used as a messenger here by Juliet. Their relationship, though, is so strong that she'll do anything to keep Juliet content. She arranges Juliet's marriage, which is to take place at Friar Laurence's place. The Nurse acts as an accomplice, alongside Friar Laurence, to bring the two lovers together, knowing there will be consequences (because of the family feud). The Nurse is immersed and now too involved with Juliet's affairs, so she strives to help her with her plans. In act 2 scene 5, the Nurse keeps Juliet in suspense about the news of marriage when she returns, as she is in a mischievous mood. This is another example of a downfall in their closely bonded relationship. The nurse enjoys keeping Juliet waiting, 'Jesu, what haste, can you not stay a while'. She makes Juliet even more excited by speaking good of Romeo, 'Your love says, like an honest gentleman, and a courteous and kind and a handsome......'. The Nurse, however, does not want Juliet to become too eager. She wants to, on purpose, keep her lingering. She therefore changes the subject, 'Where is your mother?' Later on in the end, she gives in and gives the news to Juliet about the marriage. She seems to have enjoyed winding Juliet up, but she knows when to stop, as she knows how and when Juliet becomes impatient and angry, as she knows her so well. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Nurse thinks only of the best way to get herself out of this quarrel, and so she advises Juliet to marry Paris instead, and to forget about Romeo, 'Romeo is banished, and all the world to nothing, That he dare ne'er come back to challenge you,' and 'As Paris hath. Beshrew my very heart, I think you are happy in this second match,' tell us this. Juliet becomes very annoyed at the Nurse, and feels that she has been betrayed. She angrily cries out at her Nurse 'Ancient damnation! O most wicked fiend!' She is basically cursing her Nurse here, and calling her an 'old hag'. Now, it is at this point where the relationship, which was once so deep and closely bonded between the Nurse and Juliet, falls down completely, and is therefore broken. The Nurse loses Juliet's confidence and so she went against her, losing her trust along with it. Juliet decides to seek Friar Laurence's help; thereafter she no longer involves the Nurse in her secret plans. This is the last scene in which we see the Nurse. Throughout the play she appears. However, when she loses Juliet's trust, she is lost from the play. In conclusion, the Nurse plays a critical role in Romeo and Juliet. Her relationship with Juliet and her part in the secretive romance of the two lovers cause the play's actions to move quickly and in a powerful and effective way. Her relationship with Juliet does change dramatically throughout the entire play. When Juliet dies, we feel sorry for the Nurse, as it was she who raised Juliet, fed her, and then had to witness her tragic death. ...read more.

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